Fedor Konyukhov
enru
10.02.2008

Sat phone session with Fedor

Greetings from 55 South! All is well on board good ship Trading Network Alye Parusa. We are 80 miles west from MacquarieIsland and need to dive another 40 miles south to clear this Island. I am aiming to the way point 56 South and 160 East. Again all day rain, sleet and drizzles. Poor visibility, I recon 300 meters. We are on the limit of the sub zero temperature. It is impossible to touch winch handle with bare hand, all ropes are wet and frosty. Early morning I had icy deck. Before I go on deck – I gear up like a gladiator with full set of offshore weather gear, boots, big gloves, hat and harness. All warm cloth from the bag is now on me

Details

Greetings from 55 South! All is well on board good ship Trading Network Alye Parusa. We are 80 miles west from MacquarieIsland and need to dive another 40 miles south to clear this Island. I am aiming to the way point 56 South and 160 East.

Again all day rain, sleet and drizzles. Poor visibility, I recon 300 meters. We are on the limit of the sub zero temperature. It is impossible to touch winch handle with bare hand, all ropes are wet and frosty. Early morning I had icy deck. Before I go on deck – I gear up like a gladiator with full set of offshore weather gear, boots, big gloves, hat and harness. All warm cloth from the bag is now on me. Today I even use dry suit from Survival grab bag when worked on the bow. Every morning I am checking pins and locking nuts for the stay sail and jib on the bow. I attach my self to the jack stay and walk on the bow. While I was there huge wave lifted the stern high up and I looked at empty cock-pit 20 meters behind with no one there. Some unpleasant thoughts came into my mind and I rushed back.     

There is a chance to see ice bergs or smaller bergs if we would have better weather with several miles visibility. All I can do is - shut the doors for watertight bulkheads and have the pumps ready by every watertight compartment. Sailing like a submarine – all is locked and sealed. Radar is “On” but with this 5-7 meters waves it is hard to spot the berg.

We had a good wind during the day 35-40 knots, I had 2 reefs on the main and staysail on. It was nice and comfortable on the boat, I even had a chance to read a book and made some sketches in my album. Now (20:00Perth time) wind dropped below 20 knots and shifted to west (270). Massive swell and waves still pushing and rolling the boat. When we slide down the wave we have even less wind at the bottom. I wish we had stronger winds for longer. In fact 30 knots of downwind is excellent conditions for us. Forecast shows wind from 20 to 40 knots within 48 hours.

Forgot to tell: last night we had a clear sky for several hours and I have seen the Aurora australis (or southern polar lights). Despite the unstable winds we are OK. Good coffee from “Naked Bean” coffee shop keeps me awake and warm! (Coffee shop in Albany “Naked Bean” gave Fedor 30 packs for excellent coffee for the trip from 10 countries – Round the world collection”).

Fedor”

Forecast from Lee Bruce:

“Widespread 30+kt wind near Fedor.

Fedors wind has been slow to clock to NW and NNW.  The forecast still brings the wind to about 310-320T through 10/12Z, and then quickly backs it to W or WNW about the time Fedor nears Macquarie Island (so if he wants to leave that island to port, he should pad in some room to the south in case he gets forced north of east near the island). After 11/00Z, the wind should clock again to NW or NNW.

10/00Z: NW (300-320T) 30-40kt gust 45kt squalls

10/06-12: NW to WNW 25-30 gust 35 squalls

10/18: WNW 20-25

11/00: WNW 20 (S of 55S; 10kt at 54S)

11/06: NW 15-20

11/12: NNW 15-20

12/00: NNW 30-40kt



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08.02.2008

Sat session with Fedor Konyukhov.

Greetings from Pacific. These were our first 24 hours in this GreatOcean. Pacific is my favorite ocean – it was always kind and generous to me and I hope it will let us through again. Indian – is like a young wine – sharp, playful, unpredictable you never know what will happen next 2-3 hours. In fact during my four previous round the world sailing – all major breakage and biggest storms I had in Indian Ocean.  We got to the scheduled Way Point of 50 South and 150 East. There are “Furious Fifties” latitudes and here will spend most of the time sailing Antarctica Cup Race Track

Details

Greetings from Pacific. These were our first 24 hours in this GreatOcean. Pacific is my favorite ocean – it was always kind and generous to me and I hope it will let us through again. Indian - is like a young wine – sharp, playful, unpredictable you never know what will happen next 2-3 hours. In fact during my four previous round the world sailing – all major breakage and biggest storms I had in Indian Ocean

We got to the scheduled Way Point of 50 South and 150 East. There are “Furious Fifties” latitudes and here will spend most of the time sailing Antarctica Cup Race Track. Although we have only 10 knots of wind, but the same time tomorrow it will be 40+ knots from N-N-W.

Today we had plenty of activity around the boat: a pack of Humpback whales crossed our way and went up north into Tasman Sea. Later I spotted small group of dolphins. More and more albatross are circling around the boat. We are close to the Antarctica Convergence zone where warm waters meet cold waters from Antarctica. I guess it is good feeding area for all life in the Southern Ocean.         

With the southern wind we had for several days – the air flow is very cold. I don’t have a thermometer on board and it is hard to give accurate readings, but I left plastic bottle with drinking water on deck in one of the rope pockets and this morning it was full of ice chunks. So, the outside temperature is 0 or even minus. Cold factor will play major part in this sailing.

When I skied to the South Pole in 1996 the lowest temperature I had on the Ice Cap of Antarctica was – 53C but it was very dry air, very dry and firm snow (like sans) and all you have to do is keep walking to keep you body warm. You walk for 8-10 hours then you stop, put a tent up and in 10 minutes you have your primus on and you are in the sleeping bag. Nice and warm. Everything is dry. When you are sailing in Antarctica waters and working in the cock-pit under wet snow, drizzle with waves crushing on deck – quickly you get wet. This is biggest problem out here – freezing temperature, strong wind and you are in wet gear. Once you got wet – you can’t dry out. Salt water will not evaporate. I think I felt more comfortable on the Ice Cap with -50C but dry. 

Briefly speaking: we got to the Pacific, crossed 50S, entered Gate 3 (Wilkes) on Race Track and sailed 2.000 miles from Albany. I planed to reach Gate 3 in 10 days after the start. We should be here 2 days ago – that put us 48 hours behind the schedule. Frankly speaking from the start we had only 1 day of good westerly flow. All time we spent in the Indian Ocean we had up wind, no wind or wind clocking 360 within 24 hours. I hope that here in Fifties we finally get much needed stable westerly flow.  



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05.02.2008

Sat session with Fedor Konyukhov

«It was a good day today. Clear skies with some altostratus lines up high. Wind 20 knots some times gusting up to 30 but it was all predictable. We have having massive swell. It corresponds with the forecast where it says 5-6 meters, occasionally 7. The swell is coming from S-W and it is smooth without windy tops. The boat is lifting gently. This “water express” traveled from Cape Horn across Southern Atlantic and Indian undisturbed. They picked up enormous speed. When I look at these waves – I think of eternity. Thousand years waves were going in the same direction and nothing has changed here

Details

«It was a good day today. Clear skies with some altostratus lines up high. Wind 20 knots some times gusting up to 30 but it was all predictable. We have having massive swell. It corresponds with the forecast where it says 5-6 meters, occasionally 7. The swell is coming from S-W and it is smooth without windy tops. The boat is lifting gently. This “water express” traveled from Cape Horn across Southern Atlantic and Indian undisturbed. They picked up enormous speed. When I look at these waves – I think of eternity. Thousand years waves were going in the same direction and nothing has changed here. When you see this vast ocean – your mentality changes and you begin to think differently. It is funny, but many things that seemed to be very important on dry land – here means nothing.  

We are approaching “Cay Cottee” Gate II. I was aiming for WP 140E and 50S. From there we will keep diving South towards 53 South. There are 2 low pressures one North and one South and we try to pass between them. If we manage to do so, we get 35 knots of wind, if not - we can end up with up to 50 knots of wind.

I also would like to build up some distance between New Zealand and AucklandIsland. Last time when I sailed from Hobart to Falmouth (2005) I cut the corner and end up on the bank with dozens of Korean fishermen trawlers. It was in the night, with heavy rain and gusty winds. I had to sail very close to some of the trawlers and that was not very pleasant. This time I would like to leave to port all islands and head for Cape Horn.    

The ocean is empty. Not a sign of any life. Just one albatross. Very unusual. Normally I would expect to see some whales at this area – but not yet.  

GPS shows 1500 miles from the start. Now very impressive, but first week was very light, with several times of calm. Well we have plenty of miles ahead and plenty of wind. I think we will catch up.

It was one of this rare days you would like to frame and you wish it stays like this for the rest of the journey».

Forecast from Lee Bruce (Tactical Weather):

After 05/00Z: waves 4-5m; WSW swell plus WNW seas

By 06/00: waves 5-6m, ocnl 7m (WSW swell and seas)

The weather pattern on the 9th through the 11th may be quite interesting, with strong lows passing north and south of Fedors course.  If tomorrow’s data show similar results, I will provide some charts to show that pattern.

 The squalls behind the front are occurring in much colder air aloft. We need to get some more south into Fedors course.  It still would be best if Fedor could try for a heading of about 115-130T whenever possible. I am using 53S 160E as an aiming point, but Fedor could go all the way to 53S 150E and still make the 160E WP.  If we can’t leave CampbellIsland to port, it is not a big problem, but I still want to work with that in mind.

 A front will move through within the next 12 hours, bringing colder air cold enough to result in snow showers.  The upper-level air will be plenty cold enough to support snow, but the water temperature will help keep the temperature on the boat from falling too far.  Still, snow or sleet may make it to the boat before melting.

NNW 20-25kt gust 30-35.  Squalls.

06/06-12: Backing as front moves through, becoming SSW 25 by 06/12. Snow squalls.

06/18: SSW 20-25; gust 35 possible in snow squalls.

07/00: SW 20-25

07/06: WSW 20

07/12-08/12: Light WSW to SW

Lee



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03.02.2008

Fedor Konyukhov crossed first gate alongside Antarctica Cup Race Track

Fedor crossed Gate 1 – DUMONT d@@apos@@URVILLE GATE at 2.01.00 UTC on 3rd February 08 to establish the inaugural record from the Start Line to Gate 1 with an elapsed time of 8 days 39 minutes and 20 seconds.Radio Sched Evening 03 February 08 via Iridium Sat Phone «All is well on board Alye Parusa. Today we crossed the first Gate on the Antarctica Cup Race Track – it is named after French navigator DUMONT d@@apos@@URVILLE. I read several books about DUMONT d@@apos@@URVILLE and his adventurers

Details

Fedor crossed Gate 1 - DUMONT d@@apos@@URVILLE GATE at 2.01.00 UTC on 3rd February 08 to establish the inaugural record from the Start Line to Gate 1 with an elapsed time of 8 days 39 minutes and 20 seconds.

Radio Sched Evening 03 February 08 via Iridium Sat Phone

«All is well on board Alye Parusa. Today we crossed the first Gate on the Antarctica Cup Race Track – it is named after French navigator DUMONT d@@apos@@URVILLE. I read several books about DUMONT d@@apos@@URVILLE and his adventurers. When I planned my South Pole ski expedition in 1995 we even considered to use French Antarctic station “DUMONT d@@apos@@URVILLE” on the island as transition zone to the Russian Antarctic station on continent. The plan was to cross the Southern Ocean from Hobart to DUMONT d@@apos@@URVILLE station on board Russian Icebreaker Khlebnikov and then using helicopters to fly my equipment and my self to the Russian Polar station from where I could set off for solo unsupported ski expedition to the South Pole. Later we discovered that logistic costs could be very high and I went standard route: from Chilli (Punta Arenas) I took a flight on Hercules across Drake Passage to British Polar station “Patriot Hills” from I was transported to HerculesBay by snow scoters where I started on my solo unsupported ski trip to the South Pole.

It is very dark here on the 47 South. I even had to keep the light on in my nav. station during the day. There are several layers of clouds and some black clouds so low that they catching the top of my 110 ft mast. So there is no chance for the sun to break thought this blanket. Plenty of squalls and although wind is not strong, but it is very difficult to handle the sails when wind jumps from 12 knots to 25 and back to 10-12 knots. I have not seen stable wind flow from the start. One of good news - today we have calm seas, not like that day before when we climbed massive swell from S-S-E (from the direction the boat was going). It is getting cold and I don’t have thermometer on board, but on the galley I have sea water pump to wash things – today I hardly manage to wash plate and pot before my hands become very cold. My aluminum boat does not have any insulation and obviously there is not heater on board. So when I am very cold a winch grinder is the best exercise to warm up. Run watermaker for 30 minutes. It is working slowly and under pressure. Water is cold and salinity is very high. Have not seen any wild life, just empty Ocean, or maybe I have not look around properly. That was a typical day here in the Southern Ocean and there will be many days like this. This is part of life here and you accept all that Nature brings.    

Fedor.



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01.02.2008

Fedor entered the Race Track

01 of February at 15:31 GMT maxi yacht “Trading Network Alye Parusa” crossed 45 South and entered Antarctica Cup Race Track. Fedor continue on the S-E heading toward the 48 South where he expects to get a westerly flow. According to Antarctica Cup web site: http://www.antarcticacup.com/ “The 360-degree Racetrack features gale force winds, high seas, fog, snow, icebergs, islands, extreme cold, the Antarctic circumpolar current, sailing above and below the southern Polar Convergence. The Racetrack outer and inner boundaries are located on latitude 45 S and latitude 60 S making the Racetrack 900 nautical miles wide

Details

01 of February at 15:31 GMT maxi yacht “Trading Network Alye Parusa” crossed 45 South and entered Antarctica Cup Race Track. Fedor continue on the S-E heading toward the 48 South where he expects to get a westerly flow.

According to Antarctica Cup web site: http://www.antarcticacup.com/

“The 360-degree Racetrack features gale force winds, high seas, fog, snow, icebergs, islands, extreme cold, the Antarctic circumpolar current, sailing above and below the southern Polar Convergence. The Racetrack outer and inner boundaries are located on latitude 45 S and latitude 60 S making the Racetrack 900 nautical miles wide. The wide Racetrack allows competitors to take advantage of favourable weather systems rotating around Antarctica and within the boundaries of the Racetrack.

The currents of the Southern Ocean circulate west to east, unimpeded by land. This is the only place on the planet where the oceans can circulate around the globe, uninterrupted by any continental landmass. These currents loosely follow a route tracing deeper waters, and allow water transfer between oceans.

Antarctica@@apos@@s Circumpolar Current stretches for more than 12,400 miles around Antarctica. The surface speed of the current is modest but its great depth and width make it the largest of all currents in the world@@apos@@s oceans. It carries about 135 million cubic meters of water per second around the Antarctic continent - equivalent to about 135 times the flow of all the world@@apos@@s rivers combined”.

Fedor must stay within Race Track during his circumnavigation around Antarctica. He is sailing unassisted and unsupported. He is not allowed to make a stopover for refuelling or repairs.

One interesting part is the route across the Southern Atlantic Ocean. Generally this is part of the Antarctic Ocean that is not raced across. Most races around the Southern Ocean originate in the Northern Hemisphere and turn left or right at Cape Town or Cape Horn and once back into the South Atlantic turn north again missing out the central Southern Atlantic. Some of the most extreme weather in the Southern Ocean takes place in this area, around South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands.

Forecast from Lee Bruce:

“Need to squeeze every mile to try to escape the edge of light air with the high. Assuming SE to SSE heading at 5kt through 02/12Z, Fedor will be in the SW quadrant of the high, with building NNW breeze. In NNW wind, suggest heading near 115T, to try to stay in that wind field as long as possible, but also to get enough south to tap into a west wind band later.

02/06Z: SW 5-10kt, but decreasing

02/09:  W 5 kt

02/12: NW 5, but increasing

02/18: NNW 15 kt

03/00-04/00: NNW 13-18kt”



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31.01.2008

Radio session with Fedor Konyukhov over the Iridium Sat phone

Greetings from Southern Ocean! All is well on board the maxi yacht “Trading Network Alye Parusa”. Wind shifted to N-W 15-20 knots and we have opportunity to sail south on stbd tack towards the Race Track and the Entry gate. It is drizzling for 24 hours non stop. Sky is grey and there are plenty of squally clouds. Just a few hours ago I was caught by sudden hard gust up to 35 knots. We had full main and solent. That was very unpleasant. The boat broached to port. I have double reef lines on the main sail. So it is a long process of taking reefs on my boat. It took me 15 minutes to reef the main, by that time the squall had gone

Details

Greetings from Southern Ocean! All is well on board the maxi yacht “Trading Network Alye Parusa”. Wind shifted to N-W 15-20 knots and we have opportunity to sail south on stbd tack towards the Race Track and the Entry gate.

It is drizzling for 24 hours non stop. Sky is grey and there are plenty of squally clouds. Just a few hours ago I was caught by sudden hard gust up to 35 knots. We had full main and solent. That was very unpleasant. The boat broached to port. I have double reef lines on the main sail. So it is a long process of taking reefs on my boat. It took me 15 minutes to reef the main, by that time the squall had gone. I though about reducing sail area, but was not sure. As Francis Chechester said: “if you think for the second time about taking the reef – perhaps already it is too late”

This is one the biggest challenge when you sailing maxi yacht by your self – you need to power up the boat, but keep things under control and be prepared to reduce sails at any time. For example when squall came I was inside working with water maker. I was not prepared. It will be interesting to talk to Barcelona skippers about sailing routine they had during the trace, even 2 people on board makes big difference.  

North wind brought some warm air; it is not as cold as it was yesterday, although we are got several degrees towards Antarctica

While weather is cooperative I am inspecting the boat from bow to the stern, make sure all is functioning properly before we get into heavy weather. The days are passing very quickly here. You always busy sailing a big boat. People often ask me if I get bored or how I “kill time” while sailing solo. These are strange questions to me – in fact I am running out of time when sailing 85 ft boat solo. Today I run water maker, tighten steering gear, replaced furling line on the staysail (it was chaffing in the furling drum), plus wind was shifting, gusts and so on. And then it was sun set. The day is gone.

That is all for now.

Regards, Fedor



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30.01.2008

Sat phone session with Fedor Konyukhov via Iridium

“Wind is shifted to south and picked up to up to 10 knots. It is better then 00-05 knots we had last day. The Ocean has moderate swell and no waves. Grey sky, some times drizzle. I am sailing under full main and solent. It is getting cold here and I already got into my polar gear – a goose down jacket from Russian company BASK. I used this jacket in Greenland during dog sled crossing last Spring. We crossed Greenland from East to West alongside Polar Circle with my friend Inuit – Hans at record time of 15 days. This jacket smells dogs, snow and Arctic. It brought some good memories to me today

Details

“Wind is shifted to south and picked up to up to 10 knots. It is better then 00-05 knots we had last day. The Ocean has moderate swell and no waves. Grey sky, some times drizzle. I am sailing under full main and solent. It is getting cold here and I already got into my polar gear – a goose down jacket from Russian company BASK. I used this jacket in Greenland during dog sled crossing last Spring. We crossed Greenland from East to West alongside Polar Circle with my friend Inuit – Hans at record time of 15 days. This jacket smells dogs, snow and Arctic. It brought some good memories to me today.  

First time from start I had approached galley and fried potato on pan. This is my favourite meal on board. My shore team knows that if I managed to fry potatoes (chips) – the weather is good and ocean is smooth. In all other conditions – it is not possible to spend much time by the galley.

Have not seen any ships, but last night heard plenty of Japanese talks over the VHF radio on 16 ch. I had to use radar (installed 24 hours before the start) but could not see any vessels within 16 n/miles range. VHF antenna fixed on 110 ft mast, so I can pick up ship communication that somewhere over horizon. These fishermen are big concern for me. Jon Sanders told me a story how he run into the Korean trawler in the night near FalklandsIslands. He was a sleep; the boat sailed on the pilot and he hit a trawler, damaged a pull-pit and forward stay. It the Southern Ocean nowadays there are more and more ships and you have to look out constantly. Although my yacht is equip with Active Echo Radar Detector (an electronic device that sends loud alarm in the cabin once it picked up other radar within 5 n/miles), but some times trawlers do not use radar here in the Southern Ocean.

Today we are entering Roaring Forties and will keep diving south towards the Race Track.

Fedor”

Comments from Bob Williams CEO of Antarctica Cup:

“As Fedor now sails below 40s he will be saying farewell to warm atmosphere until he heads Alye Parusa towards Albany in 60-65 days time. What effect will the constant cold have on Fedor? No racing yachtsman can tell because no racing yachtsman has been below 45s for 60-65 days”.

 Forecast from Lee Bruce (Tactical Weather USA)

“A centre of high pressure will move nearly overhead of Fedor on the 30th of January, so his wind will be light and variable again for a period.  But the high will be moving quickly, and the wind fills in nicely behind it.

 Thru 30/12Z: S to SSW 8-13kt

30/12: Bcmg light/vrbl

30/18: NNW 5-10

31/00: NW 20-25 (gust 35, esp in squalls)

31/06: WNW 30 gust 40; squalls

31/12: W 15-20

31/18: WSW 20

01:12: SW 15-20



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29.01.2008

48 hours after the start

Radio session with Fedor Konyukhov: “All is well on board the good ship “Trading Network Alye Parusa”. My yacht and I are getting into the sailing routine that we will follow for several months. In fact I feel great relief having left Albany – as this meant the start of the project which I have been dreaming about for many years. I was more concerned and was under pressure when delivering the boat from UK, Falmouth. It was an half-way around the world delivery with a stop over in Cape Town and things may go wrong at any time in any part of the Ocean and I may not get to the starting line in Albany

Details

Radio session with Fedor Konyukhov:

“All is well on board the good ship “Trading Network Alye Parusa”. My yacht and I are getting into the sailing routine that we will follow for several months. In fact I feel great relief having left Albany – as this meant the start of the project which I have been dreaming about for many years. I was more concerned and was under pressure when delivering the boat from UK, Falmouth. It was an half-way around the world delivery with a stop over in Cape Town and things may go wrong at any time in any part of the Ocean and I may not get to the starting line in Albany. It would have been be very unlucky and disappointing to damage the boat or rig on the delivery trip to Albany and eliminate all the chances to start the Antarctica Cup Race Track (ACRT) this season. I felt I could not let down my partners in Moscow, Antarctica Cup Management and all who helped me to prepare the boat for the ACRT. Once we crossed the line of Antarctica Cup Race Track in Albany – it is different now. Everything that will happen on this Race Track is part of the event.  

As Lee forecasted we run out of sea breeze 3 hours after the start and for the next 24 hours the wind was unstable with a large swell from the Southern Ocean and little boat speed – this is not a very good combinations for sailing. It was potentially quite damaging for the sails and rig. On 28th morning the wind picked up from S-S-E and we begin to drive South and even South – West. The forecast for next 48 hours looks OK, so I hope to gain some mileage. 

Yes, it is slow progress towards the Race Track and the wind was far from favorable, but as long as 26th of January (Australia Day) will be the official starting date for all future sailors in category “Solo, monohull” – we are in the equal conditions. Who knows what the wind will be like on 26 January 2009. At least we had smooth start with 10-12 knots of breeze near Albany. I did not want to maneuver in the KindGeorgeSound where it blows Force 7-8 at times.

Still warm with period of sunshine. Looks like the Southern Ocean gives me a chance to enjoy the weather before we get to Race Track (45 S) where the dominate color is Grey. Grey skies, grey ocean, rain, drizzle and sometime even snow.

Regards,

Fedor



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26.01.2008

26th January 2008 -- Albany, Western Australia – Fedor Konyukhov set out for Antarctica Cup Race Track.

One of the 9lb muzzle loader guns landed in 1893 to shore up Albany@@apos@@s defenses against a perceived Russian invasion, finally had a Russian in its sights today when Fedor Konyukhov set out from this historic West Australian port to set a solo sailing record around Antarctica. The 56 year old adventurer who sailed his Open 85ft monohull @@apos@@Trading Network Alye Parusa@@apos@@ half way round the world from Falmouth UK to take on yachting@@apos@@s last great frontier, crossed the line at 10hrs 21 minutes 40secs W

Details

One of the 9lb muzzle loader guns landed in 1893 to shore up Albany@@apos@@s defenses against a perceived Russian invasion, finally had a Russian in its sights today when Fedor Konyukhov set out from this historic West Australian port to set a solo sailing record around Antarctica.

The 56 year old adventurer who sailed his Open 85ft monohull @@apos@@Trading Network Alye Parusa@@apos@@ half way round the world from Falmouth UK to take on yachting@@apos@@s last great frontier, crossed the line at 10hrs 21 minutes 40secs W. Australia Summer Time, to the signal from the gun and a cacophony of car horns and cheers from crowds lining the foreshore.

Conditions could not have been better with bright, warm sunshine and flat seas -- a far cry from what Konyukhov can expect once he is down within the @@apos@@Roaring Forty@@apos@@, @@apos@@Furious Fifty@@apos@@ and @@apos@@Screaming Sixty@@apos@@ latitudes that mark the Antarctica Cup Racetrack.

Among the well wishers here to see Fedor off was Jon Sanders, the only other solo sailor to have ever circumnavigated around Antarctica before in southern latitudes. He completed the 14,000 mile circuit aboard the S&S 34, monohull @@apos@@Perie Banou@@apos@@ on the first stage of a remarkable double global circumnavigation back in 1981/2.

The Russian will be hampered for the next three days by very light southerly winds -- exactly the direction he needs to enter the Antarctica Cup Racetrack. "It@@apos@@s typical! The winds have been blowing hard from the east for the past two weeks. This will at least give Fedor some time to find his sea legs and re-acquaint with @@apos@@Trading Network Alye Parusa@@apos@@ before finding the westerlies" Said Richard Williams, one of the race organizers.

Fedor@@apos@@s departure marks the end of a 6 year program by Richard and his Father Robert Williams to bring the Antarctica Cup to fruition. Now, the race has sparked interest from American, British, French, Portuguese and Scandinavian sailors to take on the most exciting sailing conditions in the world -- a 14,000 mile sleigh ride around the ice-strewn seas of the Antarctica. Not something for the feint-hearted.

Click here for full details of the Antarctica Cup Racetrack

 



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12.01.2008

Fedor Konyukhov sailed to Albany, Western Australia on 12th of January 2008

After family, friends and onlookers had given him a grand welcome to Albany, Fedor said:  ‘This is my 5th visit to Australia, but my first time to the West Coast. I am very impressed with the beautiful coastline, the natural harbour of King George Sound – and particularly the warm welcome I have received here in Albany.”Bob Williams, CEO of Antarctica Cup Management, who was one of first to welcome Fedor ashore, added “It is fitting that Fedor will embark on his historic solo non-stop record attempt around the Antarctica Cup Racetrack on the same day that we Australians celebrate the birth of our Nation

Details

After family, friends and onlookers had given him a grand welcome to Albany, Fedor said:  ‘This is my 5th visit to Australia, but my first time to the West Coast. I am very impressed with the beautiful coastline, the natural harbour of King George Sound – and particularly the warm welcome I have received here in Albany.”

Bob Williams, CEO of Antarctica Cup Management, who was one of first to welcome Fedor ashore, added “It is fitting that Fedor will embark on his historic solo non-stop record attempt around the Antarctica Cup Racetrack on the same day that we Australians celebrate the birth of our Nation. Fedor is about to help us create our own piece of history. The Antarctica Cup Ocean Race around the Antarctica Cup Racetrack is the first international sporting event to be based out of Albany in Western Australia, the first inter-ocean yacht race based in Western Australia, the first in Australia, and the first in the Southern Hemisphere. The moment Fedor crosses the start line, seven years of event planning and promotion comes to realisation. It will be a great moment for us, for Fedor, and for sport in Australia.”

Konyukhov plans to cross the Antarctica Cup Ocean Race Start and Finish line off Wooding Point on the King George Sound coastline at 1030hrs on Saturday 26th January. This will provide a spectacular grandstand view for spectators as ‘Trading Network Alye Parusa’ heads south towards the entry gate of the Antarctica Cup Racetrack some 600 miles south of Albany. From there Fedor will sail 14,500 nautical miles east-about around Antarctica, round three great capes: Cape Horn, Cape of Good Hope, Cape Leewin and finish in Albany in late March 2008.

More details at www.antarcticacup.com



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