Fedor Konyukhov
enru
10.03.2008

400 miles to Cape Horn.

Open 85 yacht “Trading Network Alye Parusa” is on the final stretch to Cape Horn – less then 400 miles to go. Fedor set up a corridor of 30 n.miles between 56’30 and 57’00 South and keep the boat within this boundaries, gybeing every time the boat gets to the boarders. The wind is shifting within S-W N-W and the boat sailing 070 or 120 COG.  Fedor reported heavy snow and gusty winds, it may be considered a snow blizzard but snow melts once it reaches the ocean surface although you collect some snow in the cockpit corners. Visibility on deck is extremely poor and who knows are there any icebergs around – the radar is On

Details

Open 85 yacht “Trading Network Alye Parusa” is on the final stretch to Cape Horn – less then 400 miles to go. Fedor set up a corridor of 30 n.miles between 56’30 and 57’00 South and keep the boat within this boundaries, gybeing every time the boat gets to the boarders. The wind is shifting within S-W N-W and the boat sailing 070 or 120 COG.  

Fedor reported heavy snow and gusty winds, it may be considered a snow blizzard but snow melts once it reaches the ocean surface although you collect some snow in the cockpit corners. Visibility on deck is extremely poor and who knows are there any icebergs around – the radar is On.

The waves become shorter but traveling at very fast pace. Southern Ocean is streaming into narrow gap between Southern America and AntarcticaDrake Passage. The ocean current here is above 3 knots.

The forecast is typical for Cape Horn approach:   

11/00: WNW 30

11/06: WNW 30-35 gust 40 knots

11/18: WNW/NW 35-40 gust 50

12/00: WNW 40-45 gust 55

12/06: WSW 35-40 gust 45

Apparently with this weather system Fedor will round Cape Horn for the 4 time in his life and 2 times on board Open 85 “Trading Network Alye Parusa”. Fedor reported that conditions “good and workable – it could be worse”. 

                                                                             

 



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09.03.2008

‘Groundhog Day’

When I’m going through my log book it looks like we’re lost in time with the same cold, rain, grey sky, and pale ocean. Even the latitude position of the boat stays the same; 56 South for weeks now. Every day looks the same and brings similar conditions. Whatever I do every morning we’re still in the Southern Ocean at 56 South. The boat is on starboard tack, it’s cold and wet, – its ‘Groundhog Day’!No ships, no birds – I’ve seen only one albatross during the past week. The horizontal landscape is depressing. As an artist I learnt a lot about the human eye and vision

Details

When I’m going through my log book it looks like we’re lost in time with the same cold, rain, grey sky, and pale ocean. Even the latitude position of the boat stays the same; 56 South for weeks now. Every day looks the same and brings similar conditions. Whatever I do every morning we’re still in the Southern Ocean at 56 South. The boat is on starboard tack, it’s cold and wet, – its ‘Groundhog Day’!

No ships, no birds – I’ve seen only one albatross during the past week. The horizontal landscape is depressing. As an artist I learnt a lot about the human eye and vision. We people need to see natural bright colours - green, yellow, blue – this gives us a positive impulse and raises our mood. Here in the Southern Ocean the main colour is pale grey and its not very inspiring. The vista is hungry for colours.  

I have to fight an ‘everything is OK’ attitude –‘it might be OK with this sail trim’ – ‘it might be OK for iceberg look out’ – ‘I’m OK, I’m not hungry’ - and so on. I understand that the sails need to be re-set and I’ve not checked for icebergs for two hours. Normally on short distance races you would never allow a compromised sail trim but on a long and cold voyage like this every movement requires motivation. It’s not only sail trim - I have to force myself to cook something hot. From my previous experience I know that the body is trying to switch into a hibernation regime to save energy but we have a long way to go in similar or worse conditions and we can’t just let things get out of control and drift. It reminds me of Everest, the ‘Dead Zone’, above 8,000 meters where your oxygen starved brain tells you that everything is OK and your Will pushes you up (or down) and wont let you sit down as you may never stand up.

In the conditions we are in now big muscles won’t suffice – ‘stamina’ and ‘endurance’ – these are the essentials for long distance solo sailing and I hope I have enough of both.   

I know that we need a change and the best change would be to round Cape Horn. Such an achievement gives a boost and energizes your mood. Unfortunately we are progressing painfully slowly to the tip of South America with a damaged main sail, light winds, and the same big swell we’ve  had now for four days.

I planned that I would be in the South Atlantic Ocean ten days ago. The fact that we are not there is pressuring me. I know that a new ocean will bring new emotions and my only goal is to get to the South Atlantic as soon as possible. We are still sailing away from Albany but once we cross longitude 62 West we will be sailing towards Albany. Every mile east will bring us home. It’s the best motivation. We’re now in the middle section of the Antarctica Cup Racetrack just before ‘half way’. This is the point of maximum stress and appreciation of just how difficult the route is. Best Regards. Fedor”. 56,13.70S , 85,42.35W   

 

 



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06.03.2008

A massive Iceberg is blocking the way for Fedor.

Antarctica Cup Management are being provided iceberg tracking services by Canadian company C-CORE in conjunction with the European Space Agency (ESA). Satellite images provided on 5th March have located a massive iceberg around 70 nautical miles to the east of South GeorgiaIsland (53.84S, 34.65W). This iceberg known as A53a is 47 kilometres long and 12 kilometres wide (at 110 ks/hr it would take over an hour to drive around A53a).A53a is the most northern of around 50 massive icebergs (minimum size of 10 nautical miles long) that are located around Antarctica

Details

Antarctica Cup Management are being provided iceberg tracking services by Canadian company C-CORE in conjunction with the European Space Agency (ESA). Satellite images provided on 5th March have located a massive iceberg around 70 nautical miles to the east of South GeorgiaIsland (53.84S, 34.65W). This iceberg known as A53a is 47 kilometres long and 12 kilometres wide (at 110 ks/hr it would take over an hour to drive around A53a).

A53a is the most northern of around 50 massive icebergs (minimum size of 10 nautical miles long) that are located around Antarctica. A53a has a diagonal fissure which indicates it may soon split forming two massive icebergs. A53a in itself is not a hazard to competitors on the Antarctica Cup Racetrack but what is a hazard is the thousands of ice particles, large and small, that are constantly breaking off A53a and are making their way north. This situation will expand when A53a splits into two.

Antarctica Cup Ocean Race management team will meet on 6th March and examine the iceberg data provided and will discuss @@apos@@closing@@apos@@ some Sectors of Lanes of the Antarctica Cup Racetrack in the vicinity of South Georgia Island as well as issuing Fedor, his shore team, and weather router with instructions to exercise utmost care whilst Fedor traverses this hitherto never raced across zone of the South Atlantic Ocean. The following image of A53a is provided courtesy of C-CORE and ESA:

NOTICE TO COMPETITOR.

06 March 08. Notice of Part Closure of Sectors of the Antarctica Cup Racetrack and Yellow Flag Alert.

Due to extreme iceberg presence the following area of the Antarctica Cup Racetrack is CLOSED until further notice: The section of the INSIDE LANE between Longitude 20 West to Longitude 50 West (GATE 11). This area is now classified ‘Out-Of Bounds’.

A ‘YELLOW FLAG ALERT’ is placed over the CENTRE LANE from Longitude 30 West to Longitude 50 West. Icebergs are expected to extend well north of South GeorgiaIsland and can be expected in this sector of the CENTRE LANE. Entry to this sector should be avoided. If entry is considered necessary entry should be limited to the northern most reaches of this sector. Extreme caution must be exercised in this sector and the periphery of this sector at all times.

Quote from weather router Lee Bruce:

“That sounds reasonable to me, except that I am concerned about too narrow of a passageway coming north past Cape Horn. There isn@@apos@@t much that can be done to set up to handle adverse wind in that section--and it@@apos@@s too early to say if there will be any.  But we can try our best.

I had assumed that Fedor would be best off near the outer lane for that stretch, but the coordinates you suggest create a narrow channel for Fedor to sail through to get to that lane.  We can try our very best to honor that limitation (it makes sense for Fedor@@apos@@s safety).

The same can be said for trying to stay in the outer lane once Fedor reaches it.  Five degrees is a narrow corridor, given the changeable weather in that part of the world.  But Fedor has maintained nearly that spread since crossing the dateline, so it isn@@apos@@t impossible. We can try our best, but a small incursion south of 50S could be forced upon us. 

 



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06.03.2008

Report from C-Core representative on massive iceberg in the middle of Antarctica Cup Race Track.

“There are a lot of icebergs in this image more than I have ever seen before.  There is a massive berg (~42kmx12km) located at (53.84S, 34.65W) that may be the source of thousands of other smaller icebergs that are listed in the results.  The iceberg field spans hundreds of miles and avoiding individual icebergs as he has done in the past will be very dangerous.  I have attached a couple of pictures of the massive iceberg.  As a reference, the first image includes the South GeorgiaIsland, which has a length of approximately 180 km.  The large fissure in the middle of the iceberg, as seen in the image indicates that the iceberg may be

Details

“There are a lot of icebergs in this image more than I have ever seen before.  There is a massive berg (~42kmx12km) located at (53.84S, 34.65W) that may be the source of thousands of other smaller icebergs that are listed in the results.  The iceberg field spans hundreds of miles and avoiding individual icebergs as he has done in the past will be very dangerous.  I have attached a couple of pictures of the massive iceberg.  As a reference, the first image includes the South GeorgiaIsland, which has a length of approximately 180 km.  The large fissure in the middle of the iceberg, as seen in the image indicates that the iceberg may be unstable and may break up soon, which would mean even more ice pieces.  There was a lot of excitement in the office today when this image came up, mingled with fear for how Fedor would chart his course. 

We are able to confirm that the large iceberg that we noted in the March 1 image is called A-53A.  It is the most northerly of all the Southern icebergs. You can take a look at the confirmed locations of all the major icebergs in Google Earth using the link below. 

http://www.seaice.dk/polarview/kml/Larger_icebergs.kml

Pradeep Bobby



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05.03.2008

Update from Fedor Konyukhov.

The last 3 days were not very easy for us here deep in the Southern Ocean. With the wind was averaging below 10 knots for prolonged period and we were fighting big swell still trying to keep going. With not enough wind and big swell sails get a lot of stress and as the result I damaged main sail – 2 vertical cracks in the middle of the sail, just below second reef. Weather permitting will try to repair it with spectra patch and sicaflex. For this I need a dry day which is a rare moment here. Here on 55 South we get only 5 hours of darkness, as we are close the Polar Circle, although the rest of the time mostly dark and grey here

Details

The last 3 days were not very easy for us here deep in the Southern Ocean. With the wind was averaging below 10 knots for prolonged period and we were fighting big swell still trying to keep going. With not enough wind and big swell sails get a lot of stress and as the result I damaged main sail – 2 vertical cracks in the middle of the sail, just below second reef. Weather permitting will try to repair it with spectra patch and sicaflex. For this I need a dry day which is a rare moment here.

Here on 55 South we get only 5 hours of darkness, as we are close the Polar Circle, although the rest of the time mostly dark and grey here. I got feeling that we stuck in time – the sun suppose to come, but it is not coming. In addition with heavy fog we had yesterday I got feeling of being placed into wet and cold cellar – that is the environment we have in the nav station. In the cock-pit typical scenario: chilling wind and rain. 

It is unbelievable, so much rain is pouring into Southern Ocean – so much of fresh water being wasted. If we can transfer these clouds towards Central Australia – this area will be a Tropical forest region.

Today I switched from Pacific to W. Atlantic satellite for Sat-C terminal. Although we are still in Pacific but it seemed were out of the coverage. We have 1.100 miles to Cape Horn. The wind is picking up now.

Forecast from Lee Bruce – Tactical Weather

“The low for the 7th-9th March does not look to be quite as strong as suggested in yesterdays forecast, but 35-40kt sustained wind near Fedor still is possible on the 8th.

The forecast assumes sailing in a corridor between 55 30S and 56 30S:

 05/00: WNW 20-25kt gust 30kt

05/12: NW 30 gust 40

06/00: NW/NNW 30 gust 40

06/06: WNW 35 gust 45

06/12: WNW 30 gust 40



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02.03.2008

6 icebergs within 28 hours.

Fedor reported record number of icebergs within last 28 hours. Here are reports via Sat-C Inmarsat terminal with UTC time, position and date: Position: 54,31.78S, 120,1.64WUTC Time: 29. February 2008 21:15Iceberg to my port side within 3 miles Position: 54,38.75S, 119,18.4WUTC Time: 01. March 2008 02:30large iceberg ahead, within 5 miles. Position: 54,36.69S , 119,6.28WUTC Time: 01. March 2008 03:342 small icebergs to stbd side. Position: 54,32.79S , 117,40.73WUTC Time: 01. March 2008 13:05Iceberg to stbd side Position: 54,42.8S , 115,37.27WUTC Time: 02

Details

Fedor reported record number of icebergs within last 28 hours. Here are reports via Sat-C Inmarsat terminal with UTC time, position and date:

Position: 54,31.78S, 120,1.64W
UTC Time: 29. February 2008 21:15
Iceberg to my port side within 3 miles 

Position: 54,38.75S, 119,18.4W
UTC Time: 01. March 2008 02:30
large iceberg ahead, within 5 miles.

Position: 54,36.69S , 119,6.28W
UTC Time: 01. March 2008 03:34
2 small icebergs to stbd side.

Position: 54,32.79S , 117,40.73W
UTC Time: 01. March 2008 13:05
Iceberg to stbd side

Position: 54,42.8S , 115,37.27W
UTC Time: 02. March 2008 00:41
wind  12-15 kt  WW -FEDOR  OK  -Icebergs --

Quote from Fedor:

“Southern Pacific keeps me busy even in relaxed weather. Despite light winds and smooth ocean, I am all time on deck – scanning ocean. Icebergs are keeping pouring on me. I am filming them at different angles. Making notes in my log book, mark them on paper chart, making sketches on my note book. Full records are made about each berg. We have perfect conditions for observing icebergs. Very good visibility, clear sky, wind less then 15 knots, very smooth and low swell and no wind waves. All bergs I have seen are very tall, like skyscrapers. All of them were spotted visually and then using radar to find out distance and bearing. With sunny spells we are having now – the bergs are shining and sparkling which helps to see them at the distance.  

Using rear moments of dry weather and a bit of sunshine and dry out nav station and ventilated the boat, dry out foul weather gear, cook soup out of sour cabbage (Russian recipe) and even heat up water to wash my head. The boat progress in these conditions not very impressive but I need this pause to catch my breath after several storms and before we enter into Cape Horn zone.

Here is a quote from British Antarctic Survey on Fedor’s report of numerous bergs.

“it is expected to get more frequent observations of icebergs in the Weddell Sea sector and thus Atlantic sector. This arises as a result of the ocean current system in the Southern Ocean. Most icebergs are transported anti-clockwise round Antarctica (in the East Wind Drift) when close to the coast, and clock-wise further north (in the ACC). There are a number of preferred corridors / paths / bands of longitude where icebergs can be carried north from the EWD to the ACC. Most icebergs that calve anywhere in the sector from the eastern Ross Ice Shelf to the west round to the Antarctic Peninsula tend to stay in the EWD and so are carried into the Weddell Sea and thence out through the Weddell Sea.

So it is partly to do with proximity to the ice shelves in the Weddell region, but also associated with the dominant currents concentrating icebergs paths in this region”.

Andrew Fleming - Remote Sensing Manager
British Antarctic Survey - http://www.antarctica.ac.uk/

Fedor is now sailing in the region between Ross Ice Shelf and Weddell Sea – the main suppliers of Icebergs for the Southern Ocean. In the Southern Atlantic iceberg can travel up to Falkland, Tristan da Cunha and even Cape Agulhas in South Africa. It means Fedor will have to conduct icebergs look out all the way to 45 South in the Indian Ocean, before he turns North to Albany.     

 

 



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29.02.2008

Fedor reported forth iceberg on route.

Sat phone session from Fedor: «Another large iceberg in position 54,57.73S and 122,43.75W. It becomes very scary to sail in these waters. The situation is also complicated by Cape Horn ahead. Icebergs are great threat to the boat and to avoid or minimize this thread I need to come up North, but instead I must sail south towards Cape Horn, Drake Passage is the only gate for me to get into Southern Atlantic Ocean. I need to dive South for another 150 miles to clear the Cape and I was progressing S-E all night until we met number 4 berg. Now with head winds we have from E-S-E, I tacked and coming up NN-E until wind shifts to west

Details

Sat phone session from Fedor:

«Another large iceberg in position 54,57.73S and 122,43.75W. It becomes very scary to sail in these waters. The situation is also complicated by Cape Horn ahead. Icebergs are great threat to the boat and to avoid or minimize this thread I need to come up North, but instead I must sail south towards Cape Horn, Drake Passage is the only gate for me to get into Southern Atlantic Ocean. I need to dive South for another 150 miles to clear the Cape and I was progressing S-E all night until we met number 4 berg. Now with head winds we have from E-S-E, I tacked and coming up NN-E until wind shifts to west.

Lee Bruce wants us to be on 56 South by tomorrow to have best set up for Cape Horn, but I am holding on 54-55 South due to the “ice conditions” as 10 mm alloy plate on my boat is not best shied from compressed ice. When I met 1 berg, I was exited this was something new and different shape on the horizon. 2 and 3 berg brought some safety concerns and today’s berg gave me confirmation that we are in the belt of drifting ice from Antarctica and we are surrounded by drifting ice. It looks like the bergs are traveling N-E and we are crossing their way sailing S-E.

Now I can assure you that it is very hard to spot the berg on the radar. All 4 were spotted visually, only then I switched “On” the radar to find the distance. Even when I knew where the berg was at that moment, still on the screen it was not very clear and hard to visualize. In the storm, in high seas – chances very slim to spot the berg on the radar.     

I never experienced that many icebergs during my previous 3 round the world sailings. When you are in the storm – you have forecast with wind force, direction, wave height and period. With the bergs – it is a lottery. Am I lucky?

How about nigh time? Like yesterday – it was pitch dark, fogy and rain. With 1 million candle torch I could hardly see the bowsprit which only 15 meters ahead. The chance to spot the berg 100 meters ahead with this torch – was zero.

According to the Routing Southern Pacific chart – we only approaching to the boundaries of zone of drifting ice but the map is some 10 years old and with global warming this map in not valid any more. In my expeditions and sailing projects I am witnessing global warming in full scale. Last Spring in Greenland at the finish stretch of dos sled expedition on the west coast we had to travel 10 kilometers over the rocks and gravel, although a decade ago this area was covered by think ice Cap and glacier was dropping directly into the ocean. Here in the Southern Ocean I can see that Antarctica is loosing its ice shield rapidly and in large scale.  Any way – here we are on 54 South with 1.700 miles to Cape Horn, 10 knots of wind from S-E and confused sea and icebergs jumping out every morning. Regards, Fedor”

Forecast from Lee Bruce (Tactical Weather Ltd)

“As the low passes north of Fedor, the wind will fill in from the SW quadrant for a couple of days, before shifting to NNW ahead of the next front on the 2nd of March. As the wind shifts over the next several days, Fedor should find that his position is near 56S. That is OK, since we need to have him near 57S for the Cape Horn passage.  But given the recent iceberg sightings, that is not a position that allows for relaxation no matter the weather. The problem is that to be far enough north to lessen the iceberg threat puts Fedor too far north to reliably make a heading for passing Cape Horn. Aiming WP:  55 30S 115 00W

By 29/06Z: SW to WSW 20-25kt

29/12: SW 20-25

01/00: WNW 15

01/06: SW 13-18

01/18: WSW 15

 



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28.02.2008

Second Iceberg report.

Fedor reported 2 large icebergs in position: 53,50.54S , 124,42.65WSpeed: 5 knots, Course: 91 deg.UTC Time: 27. February| 2008 21:30Quote from Fedor “One iceberg was on my port side, another on starboard side. I sailed between them. The bergs are around 500 meters in size.  The wind is very light and we slowly passed them at 5 knots. Today is very good visibility and moderate swell so I can see for miles around the boat. I am in complicated situation now – we need to sail South towards Cape Horn, but even on 53 South there are 3 bergs in 48 hours and every degree South will increase chances to see more bergs”

Details

Fedor reported 2 large icebergs in position:

53,50.54S , 124,42.65W
Speed: 5 knots, Course: 91 deg.
UTC Time: 27. February| 2008 21:30
Quote from Fedor

“One iceberg was on my port side, another on starboard side. I sailed between them. The bergs are around 500 meters in size.  The wind is very light and we slowly passed them at 5 knots. Today is very good visibility and moderate swell so I can see for miles around the boat.

I am in complicated situation now – we need to sail South towards Cape Horn, but even on 53 South there are 3 bergs in 48 hours and every degree South will increase chances to see more bergs”.



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27.02.2008

Fedor Konyukhov - one month on Antarctica Cup Race Track.

Started on the 26 of January – Australia Day from Albany, Western Australia Open 85 “Trading Network Alye Parusa” yacht sailed 5.300 miles (9.500 km) through light and variable winds in the Indian Ocean and 3 furious storms in the Pacific Ocean and now approaching legendary Cape Horn. Quote from Fedor: «Despite various conditions we experienced within 30 days: head winds, no wind, 65 knots of wind, rain, snow, icebergs the month passed very quickly. Sailing around Antarctica was my dream for many years

Details

Started on the 26 of January – Australia Day from Albany, Western Australia Open 85 “Trading Network Alye Parusa” yacht sailed 5.300 miles (9.500 km) through light and variable winds in the Indian Ocean and 3 furious storms in the Pacific Ocean and now approaching legendary Cape Horn.

Quote from Fedor: «Despite various conditions we experienced within 30 days: head winds, no wind, 65 knots of wind, rain, snow, icebergs the month passed very quickly. Sailing around Antarctica was my dream for many years. Yes, it is very cold here and weather can be extreme but Southern Ocean has its own beauty and as an artist I am thrilled by what I see every day, by the size of the ocean we are sailing, by the environment we are surrounded. My only wish the boat to stay in working order to let me continue this magnificent journey. I am enjoying every mile of this adventure as it is once in life time opportunity. I know many offshore sailors who want and will sail Antarctica Cup Race Track but we got this privilege to sail this route first. We have unique leg ahead from Cape Horn to CapeAngulas in the Southern Atlantic Ocean. This will be new uncharted waters for me and I look forward to experience this part of Southern Ocean. I am sure that second month will be as eventful as previous and once we round Cape Horn – this will be road home, to Albany. Best regards – Fedor”



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26.02.2008

Iceberg to starboard side.

This morning we received a Sat-C message from Fedor informing that he spotted large iceberg: Position: 54,5.11S , 133,14.69WSpeed: 8 knots, Course: 68 deg.UTC Time: 25. February| 2008 16:45 GMT Later during morning Sat phone session we got all the details: «On the sun rise, I just finished sat session with Moscow, the boat was on autopilot, wind 30 knots – I looked at stbd side hatch and spotted approximately 1 mile away massive iceberg. It is hard to scale things in the open ocean but looked like more then 2 miles in size, with table flat top. Clear white colour. I could see southern ocean swell crushing on to its western side

Details

This morning we received a Sat-C message from Fedor informing that he spotted large iceberg: Position: 54,5.11S , 133,14.69W
Speed: 8 knots, Course: 68 deg.
UTC Time: 25. February| 2008 16:45 GMT

Later during morning Sat phone session we got all the details: «On the sun rise, I just finished sat session with Moscow, the boat was on autopilot, wind 30 knots – I looked at stbd side hatch and spotted approximately 1 mile away massive iceberg. It is hard to scale things in the open ocean but looked like more then 2 miles in size, with table flat top. Clear white colour. I could see southern ocean swell crushing on to its western side. I managed to film the berg while we were sailing alongside. Once we overtook it, I switched to the cock-pit camera and film it at another angle. Overall 15 minutes of video footage. While was playing with video cameras, we narrowly missed 2 big chunks of ice – size of cottage. I only spotted them when they were 100 meters from cock-pit. If this will be a night time – this berg would be hard to see. I wonder if I missed other bergs during the night. 

Last Spring I had seen a lot of icebergs in Greenland. We had a Greenland crossing expedition on dog sleds and finished on the west coast at Illulisat village. This settlement is famous for it massive glacier and its Sound is full of bergs. It is considered that iceberg from Illulisat sank Titanic but if we put iceberg I have seen today – it will fill in the Illulisat Sound from shore to shore.

Now my “wolf sleep” will be more stressful, I will be thinking about my boat sailing in the night and what is ahead of it. We still have to sail 3 degrees south to round Cape Horn – another 180-200 miles closer to Antarctica.

Wind eased off and looks like we will have 48 hours of relatively light conditions. All the best. Fedor”

Forecast from Lee Bruce:

Another complicated weather pattern is in store for Fedor, so we can plan the short-term attack, but we need to remain flexible for the longer-term.  It wouldn’t matter as much if we didn’t have Cape Horn in the way!

So far, it looks like we may be able to avoid headwinds by steering toward 52S 110W, and the long-range outlook suggests that we will have enough opportunities to get south before reaching Cape Horn.  52S is farther north than I would prefer but the weather in the Southern Hemisphere is changeable in the extreme, so we can’t stay locked in a plan if presented with a different playing field.  At the end of the day, the idea is to keep Fedor moving as fast as we can, so we just need to focus on how to make that happen without causing problems down the course.

The forecast assumes an average heading of 070-085T through 27/00Z, toward 53S 125W.  

 26/00: SW to SSW 30-35kt

26/06: SSW 20-25

26/12: WSW 15-20

26/18: NW 15-20

27/00: Shifting from NNW 15, to WNW 15-20

27/06: WSW 20-25



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