Fedor Konyukhov
enru
21.01.2009

One week at sea

We have now been at sea for one week and as mentioned before our yacht is slowly shrinking in size.  However the wonderful aspect of this is that the nine of us have grown together making up a fantastic team of dedicated yachtsman.  Not only to the art of sailing safely and quickly to our destination but also dedicated to enjoying every moment of our voyage.This morning typified the beauty of the Southern Ocean.  As our horizon swung to the morning sun the crests of waves lit up like the lights of a city before us.  Orange and red brilliant white and green danced over the ocean.  Our delight continued throughout the day.We were all below

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We have now been at sea for one week and as mentioned before our yacht is slowly shrinking in size.  However the wonderful aspect of this is that the nine of us have grown together making up a fantastic team of dedicated yachtsman.  Not only to the art of sailing safely and quickly to our destination but also dedicated to enjoying every moment of our voyage.

This morning typified the beauty of the Southern Ocean.  As our horizon swung to the morning sun the crests of waves lit up like the lights of a city before us.  Orange and red brilliant white and green danced over the ocean.  Our delight continued throughout the day.

We were all below except our helmsman when a shout rang out.   We all raced on deck to discover the most magnificent sight.  Hundreds of dolphins performing before us.  Wherever we looked the ocean was alive with dolphins skimming along the surface some occasionally leaping into the air performing perfect pirouettes like a ballerina on a stage.  As we settled down to lunch the sun was simply brilliant.  Not a cloud in the sky, fifteen knot of wind and wonderful food.  As the afternoon watch commenced Alex, Simon and Fedor settled into an afternoon movie (portable DVD) minus the popcorn of course.  The remainder of the crew, off watch, settled down for some sleep.  The watch crew were rewarded with the magnificent site of several whales gliding close by.

We expect the winds to shift to the South over the next few hours and so we may have an opportunity to head further to the East.  With just over three thousand miles till Cape Horn, even though our start was slow, it will slip by quickly as we catch the low pressure systems below us.

Of course our thoughts at times are for our families and friends and we would hope that they are comfortable knowing that our little boat is safe and secure.

Mark



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18.01.2009

Yacht \"Trading Network Alye Parusa\" left New Zealand.

Throwing off our bowlines in Auckland to sail dream and discover we soon learnt the difficulties of leaving the land of the great white cloud for it was not only the weather that made our departure difficult but also the fond memories of the friends we had made in this beautiful country, New Zealand.  As we motor sailed away in the distance was the salute on the horizon of the tower.  Little were we to know at that moment that this icon of Auckland would remain in our view for many many hours

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Throwing off our bowlines in Auckland to sail dream and discover we soon learnt the difficulties of leaving the land of the great white cloud for it was not only the weather that made our departure difficult but also the fond memories of the friends we had made in this beautiful country, New Zealand.  As we motor sailed away in the distance was the salute on the horizon of the tower.  Little were we to know at that moment that this icon of Auckland would remain in our view for many many hours. We sailed between the mainland and Great Barrier Island and were rewarded with the delights of the ocean, a nice size fish the identity of which still remains a mystery.  We turned South under sail though our progress was painfully slow however the joy of fish head soup followed by fish and potato stew filled our evening.  A fine bottle of red wine shared between the nine of us was wonderful and certainly reminded us of the past since October.

Over the next few days there was very little wind however the fantastic part of this was that my crew became accustomed to the sea and our yacht.  Often people comment on the length of her however it is not long before an eighty five foot yacht with nine crew on board shrinks to a twenty footer.  Never the less our crew is made up of a great bunch of men with us all wide eyed in anticipation  of the weeks ahead. 

We sailed South for several days taking in the splendor of the East coast as we swept slightly East to round the East Cape.  During this time we all had a chance to phone our loved ones but soon we were away with only the sound of the breeze and the waves to send us to sleep.

It has been a funny old journey so far for eight Russians and an Aussie.  With only one crew speaking fluent English the remainder of the crew have had much joy in teaching me Russian.  I am proud to say that now my Russian word bank has increased from, Russia, Vodka, Mosco and Lada to ordering a cup of tea and thanking them. Of course another important aspect is out diet and I am quickly discovering the many many ways potatoes and onions can be cooked.  All meals are garnished with cloves of garlic so I guess there will be no colds on board.  Thank goodness it is only us.

We passed to the North of Chatham Islands on an Easterly course as the wind changed sending us due South.  As we approach the forties we should at last make a positive move in the right direction.  Our forecast for the next few days is for mild winds from the South West meaning our progress to our destination will quicken.

Yet another fish was caught this afternoon and no sooner had it been landed, by our some what professional fisherman Alexander Elistratov, Fedor whipped it to the galley with sashimi being our lunch washed down by a bottle of fine white wine again shared by us nine.  A taste is enough.

As evening closes in the winds have again eased so we will motor sail through the night.  I expect some good South West winds early tomorrow morning to push us East.

Through tonight we will travel a little further South, to perhaps forty five degrees or so.  Of course we tripped over the international date line yesterday so we are now running, UTC, New Zealand daylight, Western Australian and Moscow time which makes the shifts rather difficult to coordinate much to everyone@@apos@@s amusement and laughter. 

The stars are simply beautiful and I know that someone very special to me is watching the same sparkle above.

Mark McRae



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29.12.2008

Alye Parusa is getting ready for passage around Cape Horn

Annual service and refit at Reid Yacht Service in New Zealand (Auckland) is nearly completed. Australian skipper Mark McRae sailed her from Albany in September. She was lifted out of the water first week of October and was scheduled to be re-launched by mid November, with the goal be in Sydney around Mid December to participate in Sydney-Hobart race.Soon after lifting in New Zealand hidden damage on the keel steel fin was discovered (vertical crack). Possibly this damage happened when Russian skipper Fedor Konyukhov sailed around Antarctica during inaugural Antarctica Cup race

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Annual service and refit at Reid Yacht Service in New Zealand (Auckland) is nearly completed. Australian skipper Mark McRae sailed her from Albany in September. She was lifted out of the water first week of October and was scheduled to be re-launched by mid November, with the goal be in Sydney around Mid December to participate in Sydney-Hobart race.

Soon after lifting in New Zealand hidden damage on the keel steel fin was discovered (vertical crack). Possibly this damage happened when Russian skipper Fedor Konyukhov sailed around Antarctica during inaugural Antarctica Cup race.

After few weeks investigations and consultations with boat designer, boat builder, various keel designers and steel manufactures – it was agreed that for the sake of safety it is necessary to design and produce new keel.

09 December 2008 skipper Mark McRae made official announcement to CYCA about Trading Network Alye Parusa retirement.

New keel was designed by the naval architect Jaap van der Neut (New Zealand). Based on these drawings new keel was produced by AIMECS ENGINEERING Ltd (New Zealand) in association with Holton Marine.

Just 2 days before the Christmas the boat was re-launched in Auckland. 8 Russian crew including skipper Fedor Konyukhov and project manager Oscar Konyukhov are coming to Auckland on 03 of January 2009 to get the boat ready for long distance passage: New Zealand – Cape Horn – Falkland Islands – Antigua – Falmouth (UK).

The boat will be skippered by Australian sailor Mark McRae, with Fedor Konyukhov taking part only in leg 1 (NZ – Cape Horn - Falklands) – as a co-skipper.

The 7,000-mile route has been again plotted across the rigorous Roaring Forties and the Howling Fifties. In order to sail round Cape Horn, the yacht will have to reach out to the 57th degree of southern latitude.

Fedor Konyukhov said, "To me, please God, this will be a fifth cruise round the legendary Cape Horn. To the rest of the crew that will be the first experience. The goal is to navigate the route safely and preserve the yacht and the crew. Sailing across Southern Ocean is great experience and I hope that our crew will enjoy this passage. One of the goal is to get the crew ready for next year fully crewed Antarctica Cup Russian-Australian campaign. The rules for Antarctica Cup is very simple: circumnavigate Antarctica from west to east within the corridor 45 South – 60 South, non-stop, unassisted. This is what makes AC race – the ultimate challenge for every sailor. Leg from New Zealand to Cape Horn should be good learning curve for the Russian crew before Antarctica Cup 2010".

 



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20.10.2008

Letter from CEO of Antarctica Cup to the Chairman of the Russian Senate

CHAIRMAN OF THE COUNCIL OF FEDERATION OF THE FEDERAL ASSEMBLY OF THE RUSSIAN FEDERATIONDear Mr Mironov,Greetings from Albany in Western Australia.It gives me great pleasure to write to you regarding the achievements of your esteemed fellow citizen Fedor Konukhov.Fedor representing Russia was the first man to step forward to sail his 86 foot yacht ‘Trading Network Alye Parusa’ solo in the inaugural 2008 Antarctica Cup Ocean Race

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CHAIRMAN OF THE COUNCIL OF FEDERATION OF THE FEDERAL ASSEMBLY OF THE RUSSIAN FEDERATION

Dear Mr Mironov,

Greetings from Albany in Western Australia.

It gives me great pleasure to write to you regarding the achievements of your esteemed fellow citizen Fedor Konukhov.
Fedor representing Russia was the first man to step forward to sail his 86 foot yacht ‘Trading Network Alye Parusa’ solo in the inaugural 2008 Antarctica Cup Ocean Race. The race is a non stop circumnavigation of Antarctica conducted on the Antarctica Cup Racetrack www.antarcticacup.com with boundaries located at Latitude 45° South and 60° requiring competitors to battle some of the most challenging conditions of any sporting event on Earth. The start and finish of the race is in King George Sound, Albany. The distance around the Racetrack averages 14,750 nautical Miles.

Fedor crossed the Start Line on Australia Day 26th January 2008 and crossed the Finish Line on 7th May 2008, 102 days, 01 hours, 35 minutes and 50 seconds later. This achievement has been officially recorded by the World Sailing Speed Record Council.www.sailspeedrecords.com

Fedor is now the first sailor to complete a non-stop circumnavigation of Antarctica below Latitude 45° South. The first sailor to sail across the South Atlantic Ocean from Cape Horn to Cape Agulhas (the southern tip of Africa) below Latitude 45°South.

For the most part of his 16,350 nautical mile epic solo journey Fedor sailed in the ‘Furious Fifties’ latitudes enduring howling gale force winds, giant seas, freezing sleet and snow, sighting icebergs, and enduring the harshest conditions any sailor can face. Fedor’s efforts in fighting off frostbite, improvising repairs to a damaged rudder in high seas, suffering sleep deprivation, and maintaining almost unbroken vigilant watch, ranks Fedor’s achievement equal to that of past historic Antarctic heroes such as Shackleton, Admunsden, Bellinghausen, and others.

Gates along the Antarctica Cup Racetrack are named after famous Antarctic Expedition leaders. Gate 11 is named ‘Bellinghausen Gate’ after Russian Captain Fabian Gottlieb von Bellingshausen who was the first man to sight Antarctica. In recognition of Fedor’s achievements we have named Gate 12 ‘Konyukhov Gate’.

Fedor’s efforts were watched and tracked by many thousands of spectators around the world. Fedor’s regular reports as his journey unfolded kept people enthralled and in deep admiration of his powers of endurance and commitment to achieve his goal. We as race organisers owe Fedor a great deal in establishing the solo record around the Antarctica Cup Racetrack. The record now stands as a challenge for others to better.

Fedor has earned the admiration of sailors around the world. Fedor is a fine ambassador for your country and is much loved by the people of Albany. We all look forward to Fedor, his son and project manager Oscar Konyukhov and families, returning to Albany and competing in the Antarctica Cup Ocean Race again.

Yours Sincerely
Bob Williams
Chairman
Antarctica Cup Management Pty Ltd
www.antarcticacup.com
16 October 2008.



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09.10.2008

Yacht \"Trading Network Alye Parusa\" arrived to Auckland, New Zealand

Our Australian skipper Mark McRae, with four crew, recently delivered the Open 85 ‘Trading Network Alye Parusa’ from Albany through Bass Strait and the Tasman Sea to Auckland, New Zealand. The all Australian crew of 5: Mark McRae, George Beres, Ted North, Harald Federson, Tom Whitaker had a mixed bag of weather ranging from 0 knots calms to 65+ knot storms and 10-12 meters waves. After completing the inaugural the Antarctica Cup Ocean Race www.antarcticacup.com/ which finished on the  07th May 2008, the Russian maxi yacht wintered in Albany on a mooring in Princess Royal Harbour

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Our Australian skipper Mark McRae, with four crew, recently delivered the Open 85 ‘Trading Network Alye Parusa’ from Albany through Bass Strait and the Tasman Sea to Auckland, New Zealand. The all Australian crew of 5: Mark McRae, George Beres, Ted North, Harald Federson, Tom Whitaker had a mixed bag of weather ranging from 0 knots calms to 65+ knot storms and 10-12 meters waves. 

After completing the inaugural the Antarctica Cup Ocean Race www.antarcticacup.com/ which finished on the  07th May 2008, the Russian maxi yacht wintered in Albany on a mooring in Princess Royal Harbour. During the ACOR sailing event Fedor Konyukhov circumnavigated Antarctica from west to east within the corridor 45 South – 60 South. Fedor sailed a distance of 16,500 nautical miles (30,558 kilometres) AlbanyAlbany, non-stop, single-handed. 

From May to September Mark McRae took care of the boat in Albany and did a great job. The boat was very well looked after and was always safe even in 50+ knots squalls blowing across Princess Royal Harbor.

On the 09th October the boat was out of the water at Roe Marine shipyard in Auckland for new antifouling and servicing of the ballast system. Also a new set of sails is currently being built by North Sails France with the cooperation of North Sails New Zealand. Mark submitted a work list to the shipyard which consists of 20+ service/replacement items. The last time the boat had a major refit was at Pendennis Shipyard UK during the summer of 2007. After that Fedor Konyukhov made a half way round the world delivery from UK to Albany in Western Australia covering 15.000 n/miles, the Antarctica Cup Ocean Race added a further 16.500 n/miles, and the delivery to Auckland a further 3,500 n/miles. All up the boat has sailed 35,000 n/miles between refits. Even the 3,500 n/miles from Albany to Auckland was not champagne sailing for Mark and his crew. The boat has worked hard in the Southern Ocean conditions for many months and deserves proper attention

By 01 of December all jobs must be completed and Mark will sail the boat to Sydney to take part in The Rolex Sydney- Hobart Race 2008. The boat is an official Russian entrant for this race. The crew will be international with 9 Russian sailors and 3 Australian sailors. Mark will be skippering the boat.  This is will be the first SydneyHobart experience for the Russian crew.  

Another Russian crew of 9, together with Fedor Konyukhov, is coming to Hobart by 03 of January 2009 to sail the Hobart – Cape Horn – Falkland’s Islands leg as a part of the training course for participation in the next Antarctica Cup Ocean Race scheduled for January 2010. Fedor Konyukhov will be leading a Russian crew of 4 and Mark McRae will be watch captain for the Australian crew of 4. Total there are will be 10 crew on board for the Antarctica Cup 2010 fully crewed campaign.

We also received an invitation from Bob Williams to participate in the inaugural ‘Great Australia Ocean Race’ starting in Albany in April 2009 – www.ozirace.com/. This is a 6,750 n/mile race around the great coastline of Australia heading east out of Albany and taking boats from the frigid southern waters to the tropical north of Australia and back to Albany.

As a Russian yacht we are supposed to sail in the Baltic Sea but the Southern Ocean is a great platform for unique sailing projects. We have a proven relationship with Bob Williams – the Chairman of Antarctica Cup Management Pty Ltd and organizer of both the Antarctica Cup Ocean Race event and the new ‘Ozirace’. These events present great challenges and attractions to Fedor Konyukhov who would like to share his experience with young Russian and Australian sailors and let them see for themselves the power and beauty of the ‘Deep South’ so many times described by Fedor in Sat-C messages from the boat during the inaugural Antarctica Cup Ocean Race.   



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23.05.2008

It\'s official now

The WSSR Council announces: Antarctica Cup course inaugural recordAlbany to Albany, Australia.Yacht:  "Trading Network Alye Parusa. 85 ft MonohullName: Fedor Konyukhov. RUSDates: 26th January 2008 to 7th May 2008 Start time: 01:21:05 UTC Finishtime: 02:56:55 UTC Elapsed time: 102 days 1 hour 35 minutes 50 secondsJohn ReedSecretary to the WSSR Council“As we reflect on the achievement of Fedor Konyukhov navigating the Antarctica Cup Racetrack we realise we have witnessed a supreme display of daring and intelligence

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The WSSR Council announces:
Antarctica Cup course inaugural record
Albany to Albany, Australia.
Yacht:  "Trading Network Alye Parusa. 85 ft Monohull
Name: Fedor Konyukhov. RUS
Dates: 26th January 2008 to 7th May 2008 Start time: 01:21:05 UTC Finish
time: 02:56:55 UTC Elapsed time: 102 days 1 hour 35 minutes 50 seconds
John Reed
Secretary to the WSSR Council

“As we reflect on the achievement of Fedor Konyukhov navigating the Antarctica Cup Racetrack we realise we have witnessed a supreme display of daring and intelligence. Fedor dared to take on the Antarctica Cup Racetrack solo in his 85@@apos@@ yacht "Alye Parusa@@apos@@ but in so doing did it with great intelligence. The boat was supremely prepared. It did not fail Fedor. Fedor sailed @@apos@@Alye Parusa@@apos@@ with the knowledge that one mistake would be enough to bring him within the clutches of great peril. Despite the sea and weather conditions, sleep deprivation, the cold, icebergs, Fedor stayed on top of his game. If ever there is a candidate for ocean racings @@apos@@Hall of Fame@@apos@@ Fedor Konyukhov is it”.

Bob Williams Chairman
Antarctica Cup Ocean Race



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09.05.2008

Antarctica Cup Racetrack GATE 12 named after Fedor Konyukhov.

Antarctica Cup Ocean Race event management announce the naming of GATE 12 (0W/0E Meridian) of the Antarctica Cup Racetrack - GATE 12 KONYUKHOV GATE in recognition of inaugural Antarctica Cup Ocean race champion Fedor Konyukhov completing the Antarctica Cup Racetrack solo in his 85@@apos@@ yacht @@apos@@Trading Network Alye Parusa@@apos@@ and establishing the benchmark elapsed time of 102 Days, 0 Hours, 35 Minutes, 50 Seconds. KONYUKHOV GATE is east of GATE 11 – BELLINSGAUSEN, legendary Russian sailor and commander who become the first person to see Antarctica continent

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Antarctica Cup Ocean Race event management announce the naming of GATE 12 (0W/0E Meridian) of the Antarctica Cup Racetrack - GATE 12 KONYUKHOV GATE in recognition of inaugural Antarctica Cup Ocean race champion Fedor Konyukhov completing the Antarctica Cup Racetrack solo in his 85@@apos@@ yacht @@apos@@Trading Network Alye Parusa@@apos@@ and establishing the benchmark elapsed time of 102 Days, 0 Hours, 35 Minutes, 50 Seconds.
KONYUKHOV GATE is east of GATE 11 – BELLINSGAUSEN, legendary Russian sailor and commander who become the first person to see Antarctica continent. Both Gates established in Southern Atlantic, Fadey Bellinsgausen has landed to Antarctica cost in the Southern Atlantic Sector and Fedor Konyukhov is the first solo sailor to race across Southern Atlantic Ocean below 45 South from Cape Horn to Cape Angulas.



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07.05.2008

07 May 08. Day 102. \"We knocked the bastard off\"

As Edmund Hillary and Tensing Norgay reached the base camp after scaling Mount Everest Hillary famously exclaimed – “we knocked the bastard off”. Fedor Konyukhov and his trusty companion ‘Trading Network Alye Parusa’ having today conquered the ‘Everest’ of ocean racing has also “knocked the bastard off”. Only this time it’s the Antarctica Cup Racetrack that has been conquered. Congratulations Fedor on a remarkable achievement by a remarkable man. Elapsed time to complete the Antarctica Cup Racetrack 102 Days 0 Hours, 56 Minutes 50 Seconds. photo-report

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As Edmund Hillary and Tensing Norgay reached the base camp after scaling Mount Everest Hillary famously exclaimed – “we knocked the bastard off”. Fedor Konyukhov and his trusty companion ‘Trading Network Alye Parusa’ having today conquered the ‘Everest’ of ocean racing has also “knocked the bastard off”. Only this time it’s the Antarctica Cup Racetrack that has been conquered. Congratulations Fedor on a remarkable achievement by a remarkable man. Elapsed time to complete the Antarctica Cup Racetrack 102 Days 0 Hours, 56 Minutes 50 Seconds.

photo-report



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06.05.2008

100 miles to go

Fedor reported that he has less then 100 n/miles to the finish line. The ocean is nice and smooth, although the wind is right on the nose – from N-E. Fedor has to sail very close to the wind with COG 010, then will tack to sail east, then tack again to sail on the direct course to Albany. Fedor Konyukhov over the phone: “The sky is magnificent; I have not seen such a blue sky for ages. Sun shine, gentle Ocean, dolphins – is it for real? Only 3 days ago I was battling 50 knots of S-W wind, massive waves, cold and now enjoying Mediterranean style cruise

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Fedor reported that he has less then 100 n/miles to the finish line. The ocean is nice and smooth, although the wind is right on the nose – from N-E. Fedor has to sail very close to the wind with COG 010, then will tack to sail east, then tack again to sail on the direct course to Albany.

Fedor Konyukhov over the phone: “The sky is magnificent; I have not seen such a blue sky for ages. Sun shine, gentle Ocean, dolphins – is it for real? Only 3 days ago I was battling 50 knots of S-W wind, massive waves, cold and now enjoying Mediterranean style cruise. If it not the head winds, I would get to Albany by mid night today, but with several tacks I need to place it will take another half a day to get to Eclipse Islands where I expect to meet press boat from Albany. My yacht looks very happy and seems enjoy the warm and sunny weather. Sure she deserves such a treatment after working non stop from 12 of October 2007, the day we left FalmouthUK to sail to Albany. One week in Cape Town and 2 weeks in Albany – that was it – short rest for good ship Open 85 “Trading Network Alye Parusa”. I was standing and looking how her bow relentlessly piercing the ocean and this is happening for nearly 30.000 miles in one season – great respect to this vessel.  

I check my food stock. Nothing testy, so will wait until we get to Albany and order nice thick steak. Clean sheets, shower, nice dinner and 12 hours sleep, may be it sounds basic, but this is exactly what I need.



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05.05.2008

200 miles to the finish line

Fedor Konyukhov reported at 18-00 WA time: “On the sun set I went on deck just on time – on the portside bow I noticed giant sperm whale on a collision heading with my yacht. He was steaming to the southern ocean without paying any attention to my vessel. He was like a big drift wood, but with powerful fountains. I just managed to bear away from this mammal and it passed 5-6 meters from bowsprit! If I did not take some actions – we would certainly hit him (I am sure it was male, based on his dimensions, probably 20 meters LOA). It reminded me that you should never say – we are in the safe waters, until you put your boat alongside the Jetty

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Fedor Konyukhov reported at 18-00 WA time: “On the sun set I went on deck just on time – on the portside bow I noticed giant sperm whale on a collision heading with my yacht. He was steaming to the southern ocean without paying any attention to my vessel. He was like a big drift wood, but with powerful fountains. I just managed to bear away from this mammal and it passed 5-6 meters from bowsprit! If I did not take some actions – we would certainly hit him (I am sure it was male, based on his dimensions, probably 20 meters LOA).

It reminded me that you should never say – we are in the safe waters, until you put your boat alongside the Jetty. Even with 200 miles to the finish line anything may happened. Like right now I am in tricky situation. I have all sails up, full main and solent, the night is coming and black clouds are arriving on the scene. I am fighting temptation to reduce sails area to be on the safe side in case of sudden squall or gust, but at the same time don’t want to slow down the boat. It would be crazy to damage the rig or sail so close to the finish, but I also need to get to Albany before prolonged period on light winds arrive, followed by Low pressure coming soon. Definitely this night will be stressful and sleepless, although the ocean is smooth and it is very, very arm here, well at least compare to what I had 3 days ago. Regards. Fedor   



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