Fedor Konyukhov
enru
19.07.2016

Crossing of South America completed!

Konyukhov’s MORTON balloon crossed the territory of Chile in just an hour and five minutes, taking two hours to fly over the Andes mountains, with Mount Aconcagua to starboard.

Details

Konyukhov’s MORTON balloon crossed the territory of Chile in just an hour and five minutes, taking two hours to fly over the Andes mountains, with Mount Aconcagua to starboard.

The flight over Argentina was completed at 21:50 UTC the same day. The total flight time over Argentina was 9 hours and 20 minutes.

The flight over Uruguay was just 4.5 hours.

And southern tip of Brazil Fedor crossed in 30 minutes. 

Currently the balloon is flying over Atlantic Ocean!

On behalf of the pilot Fedor Konyukhov and the organising committee of the round-the-world flight, we thank ATC Santiago, ATC Mendoza, ATC Buenos Aires, ATC Cordoba, and ATC Montevideo for their amazing professionalism.  The MORTON balloon was flying across the busiest air routes of South America. A big thank you to our friendly Air Traffic Controllers.

The head of the Flight control centre in Australia, Oscar Konyukhov has said "It’s been exactly a week since Fedor Konyukhov’s flight took off from Australia.  Fedor has covered exactly half of the planned route and traversed most of the planned countries on route.  I’d like to emphasize that all Air Traffic Control centres of Air Transport Authorities in respective countries have greeted Fedor on entering their airspace and farewelled him with kind words and wishes of a successful flight at the exit from their airspace.

Air traffic controllers from Australia, New Zealand, French Polynesia (yes, the Morton balloon was in their area of responsibility for almost 10 hours), Chile, Argentina, Uruguay and Brazil have demonstrated great diligence and care in trying to do everything possible for the pilot not to be distracted by extra manoeuvring.

Such attentiveness is aided by wide coverage of the flight in the world media and by the fact that most Air traffic controllers themselves belong to the flying community. They are not indifferent to these kinds of aviation projects.  However, it is worth mentioning that Fedor’s ground crew also worked extra hard in advance to ensure MORTON balloon’s arrival in South America was not entirely unexpected for air traffic controllers.  The team  secured all permits both for entry into the airspace and for transit over the territory of each respective country.”

Flight control centre in Australia would like to thank its partner company, Flight Service Bureau for their assistance in arranging permits to fly over the territory of the whole of South America.  The company specializes in a wide range of private aviation services, including permission for flights in the airspace of most countries.

Flying over South America, brought back a series of memories from past expeditions for Fedor.  He flew a few kilometres North of the port of Concon (Chile), the launching point of his December 2013 solo voyage on board the rowing boat Turgoyak, arriving on the coast of Australia (Mooloolaba on the Sunshine Coast) 160 days later.  Of course, Fedor’s mind went back to this most difficult undertaking.

The balloon also flew just to the north of the highest mountain in the Southern Hemisphere - Aconcagua, which Fedor climbed on 9 March 1996 while conducting his "Seven Summits of the World" program.

When crossing Uruguay with the city of Punta del Esta starboard.  It was an official port of call during the round the world race called “Around Alone 1998-99” in which Fedor participated in a 60-foot yacht belonging to the "Modern Academy for the Humanities", which he called “an excellent sailing club with very hospitable people”.

So it happened that the current route of Fedor’s balloon lies over the three South American countries, each of which is associated with memories of the past expeditions.  The Atlantic Ocean is ahead.  Heading for Cape Town.  Fedor will also have a lot to remember while flying over Cape of Good Hope.., but first he would need to cross another ocean.

Morton has flown farther north than Steve Fossett’s route during his round the world flight , adding many more kilometres of distance to Fedor’s flight path compared to Steve’s.

Pictured: Steve Fossett’s actual flight path in his successful June-July 2002 solo flight. Fossett kept to the South from the beginning, crossing close to Tasmania and remaining in the Southern Ocean latitudes almost the whole time during his round the world flight.

You can follow the balloon’s path here: https://my.yb.tl/RRTW2016

You can also view the route map at www.iridium360.ru

The official website for the project “Around the world in a Roziere balloon “Morton” can be found at a flyfedor.ru



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18.07.2016

Fedor Konyukhov has crossed the Pacific Ocean in 92 hours!

On July 18 at 11:30 (UTC) the MORTON balloon and its pilot, Fedor Konyukhov, completed the crossing of the Pacific Ocean from continent (Australia) to continent (South America). Fedor Konyukhov became the second pilot in history to cross the Pacific Ocean solo nonstop in a balloon.

Details

On July 18 at 11:30 (UTC) the MORTON balloon and its pilot, Fedor Konyukhov, completed the crossing of the Pacific Ocean from continent (Australia) to continent (South America).

Fedor Konyukhov became the second pilot in history to cross the Pacific Ocean solo nonstop in a balloon.

Before Fedor only Steve Fossett had crossed the Pacific Ocean solo: once in the northern Pacific and twice in the southern Pacific.

Here is a recent historical timeline of attempted balloon crossings:

1995. Northern Hemisphere. American pilot Steve Fossett took off from Seoul, Korea in a Roziere (R150) balloon, landing in Canada. Fossett covered a distance of 8748 kilometres in 102 hours.

2001.  Southern Hemisphere. Steve Fossett departed from Northam, Australia in a Roziere (R550) balloon in an attempt at an around the world trip. Having crossed the Pacific Ocean, Fossett was forced to land in Brazil 300 hours and 19,260 km after take-off due to technical problems.

2002.  Southern Hemisphere as part of Steve Fossett's successful solo circumnavigation.

It is unbelievable that since Steve Fossett there have been no successful solo nonstop crossings of the Pacific Ocean in a balloon of any kind (hot air, gas or Roziere).

On July 14, 2016 (15:20 UTC) Fedor Konyukhov’s balloon cleared the East Coast of Australia, and on July 18, 2016 (11:30 UTC), it crossed the coast line on the other side of the Pacific to enter Chilean airspace.  The total flying time of the Pacific crossing took 92 hours and 10 minutes, with preliminary calculations indicating the average speed over the ocean was 142 kilometres per hour, and the distance travelled was 13,070 kilometres. The MORTON balloon’s flight will be thoroughly analysed upon landing.  Though it is early days, we would like to believe that the flight has set a new benchmark for South Pacific crossing.

You can follow the balloon’s path here: https://my.yb.tl/RRTW2016

You can also view the route map at www.iridium360.ru

The official website for the project “Around the world in a Roziere balloon “Morton” can be found at a flyfedor.ru



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17.07.2016

Fedor Konyukhov is approaching coast of South America

During the last 24 hours Fedor had to perform a few difficult manoeuvres. Yesterday afternoon the pilot saw large cumulus clouds (cumulonimbus) on the horizon, at the height of 10-11 km, well above the Morton balloon flight level.

Details

During the last 24 hours Fedor had to perform a few difficult manoeuvres.   Yesterday afternoon the pilot saw large cumulus clouds (cumulonimbus) on the horizon, at the height of 10-11 km, well above the Morton balloon flight level.   He decided to descend, that meant turning to the left and trying to go around the clouds.   The speed of flight has reduced, but the balloon flew away from the cumulonimbus cloud.   Fedor took a bearing on the cloud, so that he could pass clear of the cloud as with a ship in the ocean.   All went well with this manoeuvre.   Just as he finished the manoeuvre, the night fell and he was flying blindly in the night, through the tops of the clouds.   He encountered snow and ice crystals.   A layer of ice a few centimetres thick has formed on the gondola.  The turbulence was so severe that the propane cylinders were swinging and hitting each other.   The gondola was hanging on the rafters and swinging like a cradle, suspended at the height of 8 kilometres.  There was poor visibility.   Fedor had to jettison a few half-empty cylinders, as they were swinging very dangerously.  That helped.

In the morning the (somewhat lighter) balloon - went up to 8200 km and… a safety valve venting excess pressure from the oxygen cylinder has failed. Pressure raised to 5 Bar.  Another 10 minutes and the emergency valve (Burst disk) would have gone off.  This would have meant an end to flying at high altitudes, and in this case the pilot needs to go down to 3000 meters (as per his instructions) and start preparations for landing. Fedor had to jump on top of the gondola and manually vent pressure from 5 bar to 3 bar.  The problem has not yet been solved, the pilot will have to manually adjust the pressure in the liquid oxygen cylinder, which hangs outside, possibly, until the end of the flight.  

Photo: Oxigen cilinder with a pressure gauge, pressure relieve valve and manual purge vent.

The cold front did not end either.  Clouds stretched as far as one can see.  Suddenly burner number 3 malfunctioned.   Adapter connector has bust and was venting gas.  To prevent fire, Fedor had to shut off the faulty burner.  Now there are only 5 functioning burners remain (3 on one sides and two on the other).  The envelope is covered with ice, above-zero air temperatures start only at 2000 meters above the ocean surface.  Going down is not possible (yet) due to cloud below. Currently Fedor has to carry hundreds of kilograms of ice stuck to the balloon’s envelope.  

These were the last 24 hours in the life of the pilot Fedor Konyukhov.  

Ahead are the Andes with a maximum height of 7000 meters (Mt. Aconcagua).  It is necessary to fly with a good altitude margin in order to avoid a possible wind rotor turbulence.  Fedor slept for 2 hours in total in four 30 minutes intervals.  He ate only once and mostly survives on energy bars and water.  Chilean aviation authorities do not recommend to transit in the corridor between 30-35 degrees south latitude and would like to see balloon to the south, in the direction of Puerto Montt - Cape Horn, where there is minimum traffic and lower mountains.  At this point in time it is not possible to meet their requirements due to jet stream direction flow.

14200 km covered.

You can follow the balloon’s path here: https://my.yb.tl/RRTW2016

You can also view the route map at www.iridium360.ru

The official website for the project “Around the world in a Roziere balloon “Morton” can be found at a flyfedor.ru



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16.07.2016

Jumping over cold front in the Pacific

In a few hours Fedor will have to negotiate a large occluded front stretching across the Pacific Ocean from the coast of Antarctica to 20 degrees south latitude.

Details

In a few hours Fedor will have to negotiate a large occluded front stretching across the Pacific Ocean from the coast of Antarctica to 20 degrees south latitude.  

Our weather adviser suggests the following:

«the best option of all altitudes is to maintain 7000m for the next 12-24 hours, maybe longer. That way we cross the front in a less active part and smaller zone between 18 and 20 UTC, which is beginning of daylight for Fedor. The more active part will be to the north of him. I may suggest a different altitude when reaching the front and I will keep a close eye on things. Good luck»!

Yesterday Fedor already spotted 5 Cumulonimbus clouds approximately 10 kilometers high with an anvil-shape top with their ‘mares’ tails’ pointing north.  There was some distance between them and he managed to navigate between them.  

 

Trajectories still look good the second part of the Pacific Ocean.

You can follow the balloon’s path here: https://my.yb.tl/RRTW2016

You can also view the route map at www.iridium360.ru

The official website for the project “Around the world in a Roziere balloon “Morton” can be found at a flyfedor.ru



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15.07.2016

Morton balloon is at Western hemisphere!

15 July 12:00 UTC Fedor crossed 180 Longitude and now in Western hemisphere. He went back to the past - it is Thursdays 14 of July for Fedor again!

Details

15 July 12:00 UTC Fedor crossed 180 Longitude and now in Western hemisphere. He went back to the past - it is Thursdays 14 of July for Fedor again!

Balloon speed increased to 170 km/h. Fedor reported that it become warmer, as a result of flying over the ocean (it was colder when flying over Australia).

He is in good spirit and enjoys beautiful sky with half Moon. Big ocean is in front of him. Next land is South America which is 10,000 km away.

You can follow the balloon’s path here: https://my.yb.tl/RRTW2016

You can also view the route map at www.iridium360.ru

The official website for the project “Around the world in a Roziere balloon “Morton” can be found at a flyfedor.ru



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15.07.2016

Morton balloon reaches New Zealand

Airways New Zealand confirms the balloon carrying Russian adventurer Fedor Konyukhov on his world record attempt to circumnavigate the globe has entered New Zealand airspace.

Details

Airways New Zealand confirms the balloon carrying Russian adventurer Fedor Konyukhov on his world record attempt to circumnavigate the globe has entered New Zealand airspace.

The balloon was picked up by air traffic control shortly after 12pm, Airways Chief Operating Officer Pauline Lamb says. It is expected to travel around the tip of the North Island and out into the southern Pacific Ocean at altitudes of up to 26,000 feet.

“We’ve created a two-hour virtual bubble or ‘reservation area’ around the balloon. We will protect this with our normal airspace separation procedures which means all other aircraft will be directed to fly around the reservation area,” Ms Lamb says.

The balloon has the same surveillance and communications equipment on board that a normal aircraft would, including a transponder and satellite phone. Airways’ Oceanic Control Centre in Auckland is receiving updates on the balloon’s location every 10 minutes.

It is exciting for New Zealand to be part of this world record opportunity, Ms Lamb says. “Since we learned the balloon was on its way, we’ve been working with our customers and the regulator to adjust our operations to facilitate this journey safely and minimise any potential disruption.”

Ms Lamb says high altitude ballooning is an emerging technology and Airways is working to support its development.

“Airways has facilitated a number of balloon launches, including the launch of Nasa's super-pressure scientific balloon in Wanaka in May, which we have gained a great deal of knowledge from.”

Russian pilot Fedor Konyukhov and Flight Control Center in Northam, WA say: «Big thank you to Airways New Zealand».

You can follow the balloon’s path here: https://my.yb.tl/RRTW2016

You can also view the route map at www.iridium360.ru

The official website for the project “Around the world in a Roziere balloon “Morton” can be found at a flyfedor.ru



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15.07.2016

Flying over the ocean

Morton balloon has crossed the longitude of 163 degrees east and is currently flying in New Zealand airspace. Last night, the pilot Fedor Konyukhov left the Green continent in the hopes of circumnavigating the globe and returning to welcoming Australian soil.

Details

Morton balloon has crossed the longitude of 163 degrees east and is currently flying in New Zealand airspace.  Last night, the pilot Fedor Konyukhov left the Green continent in the hopes of circumnavigating the globe and returning to welcoming Australian soil.  When Fedor was crossing the coast, air traffic controllers farewelled him on their radio frequency and said: “good luck, Fedor”.  An hour later, the balloon flew over Lord Howe island.  Currently, the ground crew is keeping in touch with air traffic controllers in New Zealand (Auckland).  We received permission to fly at FL 260 (26,000 feet) or 7,924 meters.  We are satisfied with this flight level for today.

Now that the Morton balloon is over the ocean, we have the opportunity to take a breath and look back at the 3 day and 5000 km long flight.  We will also try to answer some questions that we received here at the Flight Control Centre.

Why was Fedor flying at the height of 6,700-7,000 meters during the first few days?  The media announced a flight level of 8,000 meters…

These flight levels have been calculated on the basis of the maximum take-off weight of the balloon (MTOW), at 9762 kg.  In order to rise above 7,000 meters on the first day (for example to 8,000 meters) we had to leave behind a few fuel cylinders (filled with propane) to the equivalent of 5 days of flying.

Morton balloon took off with the maximum fuel load of 35 steel cylinders of propane.  Total fuel weight was 5,355 kg.

How is the weight of fuel calculated?

Breakdown of the fuel weight: each steel cylinder weighs 49 kg.  The cylinder is pumped with 94 kilograms of propane gas.  In addition, about 10 kg of ethane is pumped into each cylinder.  Ethane is added to propane for the purpose of improving the overall saturation vapour pressure of the gas mixture, in order to avoid reducing the gas pressure in the cold (Morton balloon flies in sub-zero temperatures at all times).  So, the total weight of each cylinder is 153 kg (with small tolerances) x 35 = 5,355 kg.

What are technical parameters for the gas envelope?  How heavy is the shell?

A fully assembled shell weighs 1, 628 kg.  The volume of the gas compartment is 15, 575 cubic meters.  60% of the volume of the gas envelope has been filled with helium just before the start. Considering the height, when heated by the sun the helium considerably increases in volume, so the pressure inside the balloon is formed.  Excess helium is automatically pitted through appendices (the sleeves on both sides of the ball).  At the start we pumped in approximately 9,700 cubic meters of helium.

Buoyancy of helium is as follows: 1 m³ of helium lifts 1 kg of weight.  At night before the start our team pumped helium until the balloon reached the state of equilibrium (the state of equilibrium is when the balloon does not rise, but is not touching the ground).  At dawn Fedor ignited the burners and the balloon journeyed into the sky.

Photo: Morton

Why so many cylinders?

For the first leg of the trip, just to cross the Pacific (from Australia to Chile) Fedor would have only required a quarter of his current propane stock as you could fairly accurately predict the height and strength of the jet stream for most of this route.  However, Fedor endeavours to fly around the world. Due to this huge distance many uncertainties lay ahead of him.

No meteorologist or computer model can forecast the speed or direction of the wind when flying a route of 30,000+ km.  Weather forecasts are reliable up to 5 days maximum.  We will not be able to avoid unexpected changes in velocity. Therefore, Fedor will not be able to fly around the world in a single jet stream. 

(A brief note from Alex Vikulov, a member of Fedor Konyukhov’s expedition HQ and a former BoM meteorologist: “Jet streams are fast generally westerly air currents found in the upper troposphere.  They are constantly meandering, may develop and dissipate, split in two or more streams, combine into one stream and even develop closed circulation eddies”.)

Estimated fuel consumption is 1.5 cylinders per day.  So, the total fuel reserve gives Fedor 23 days of flying.  Currently Fedor is on track in regards to our fuel consumption estimate.  

Previously there were only two successful around the world balloon flights:

One took place in the Northern Hemisphere in 1999 and it took them 21 days to complete the flight (two pilots).

The other took place in the southern hemisphere in 2002 and it took him 13 days (one pilot).

We hope for the best but are prepared for any situation.  Our estimates were based on a conservative scenario.  The first three days over Australia have demonstrated that our conservative approach to fuel reserves was accurate.

Photo: Morton

Could you have revised the launch window?

No.  A huge shell, consisting of three sections, has been assembled and filled without fail.  The lift-off of the balloon was executed perfectly.  The climb happened according to plan.  The pilot has tested all systems during the first two days of flying.  Everything has now been fixed and calibrated. Australia astern.  Fedor is flying over the Pacific Ocean with New Zealand on his starboard side, at a current  height of 7500 meters and speed of 130 km per hour.

 

Greetings. 

Oscar Konyukhov.  

Headquarters of the expedition.  

Northam, Western Australia

Translated by Alex Vikulov

You can follow the balloon’s path here: https://my.yb.tl/RRTW2016

You can also view the route map at www.iridium360.ru

The official website for the project “Around the world in a Roziere balloon “Morton” can be found at a flyfedor.ru



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13.07.2016

Day 2

The 13th of July. Fedor Konyukhov has completed the second set of day light hours flying of his circumnavigation flight. Morton balloon so far has transcended 1650 kilometers, crossed the territory of the State of Western Australia, and is currently flying over the state of South Australia. Fedor Konyukhov is in his second night flying.

Details

The 13th of July.  Fedor Konyukhov has completed the second set of day light hours flying of his circumnavigation flight.  Morton balloon so far has transcended 1650 kilometers, crossed the territory of the State of Western Australia, and is currently flying over the state of South Australia.  Fedor Konyukhov is in his second night flying.  Yesterday afternoon the pilot undertook a maneuver of turning his balloon to the north.  He descended from 7200 meters to 4800 meters.  At lower altitudes the wind backs more to the north, but wind speeds drop.  At an altitude of 4800 the balloon’s speed did not exceed 30 kilometers per hour.  Then it was decided to go back to the height of 6700m, which is 500 meters below the ceiling for day flying.  During a solo flight the pilot must perform all actions on his own, must maintain radio contact, keep in touch with his Flight Control Centre in Australia and change empty gas cylinders single-handedly.  Today, at an altitude of 7000 meters, Fedor, for the first time, had to clean burners from ice.  This will be a regular procedure that the pilot will have to perform before each ignition of the burners.

The ground crew is in constant contact with the aeronautical authorities of Australia.  We are trying to obtain permission to climb to the class "A" altitudes to the height of 24,500 feet (FL 245).  A permit must issued for flying in zone "A".  Morton balloon is getting closer to large airports of the Australian east coast, such as Melbourne, Sydney and Brisbane.  We also keep in touch with air traffic controllers in New Zealand and making initial contact with air traffic controllers in Santiago (Chile) and Mendoza (Argentina).

There is an active discussion in social networks on the subject of whether the record of Steve Fossett will be broken.  Of course, it's great to improve the records, but do not forget that in order to set a record, one must first fly around the world.  It took 6 attempts for Steve Fossett to achieve that in his balloon Spirit of Freedom.  Bertrand Piccard and Brian Johnson (in their Breitling Orbiter 3 balloon) have succeeded only on their 3rd attempt, there were two pilots on board of their balloon and their gondola was pressurised.  These should not be compared with the work of a single pilot in a non- pressurised gondola.  There are still tens of thousands of kilometres ahead, and every minute the pilot is faced with the task of solving multiple complex problems.

The current time in Northam is 22:00 (Western Australian local time).  The entire international team has assembled at the Flight Control Centre, including Don Cameron, who has a flight across the Atlantic and a flight from England to the Soviet Union on a combined Rozière balloon to his credit.  John Wallington, holder of an Australian record for crossing the continent from west to east and other experienced pilots are also present.  The ground team effort is up to the mark and continues uninterrupted for 24 hours a day.  

You can follow the balloon’s path here: https://my.yb.tl/RRTW2016

You can also view the route map at www.iridium360.ru

The official website for the project “Around the world in a Roziere balloon “Morton” can be found at a flyfedor.ru

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12.07.2016

Liftoff!

The Russian Rozière hot-air balloon Morton completed a successful takeoff from Northam airport in Western Australia on 12 July, the point of liftoff being recorded as 7:30 am local time.

Details

The Russian Rozière hot-air balloon Morton completed a successful takeoff from Northam airport in Western Australia on 12 July, the point of liftoff being recorded as 7:30 am local time.

This event is the culmination of two years of design and preparation, as well as shipping and assembling Morton.

The balloon’s take-off was preceded by twenty-four hours of tense work, from the assembly of the envelope to setting up all of the equipment at the airport. The team began extracting the envelope (what we’d call the “balloon” part of the aircraft) from its container at 8:00 am on 11 July, and Morton was ready to go exactly one day later.

U.K.-based Balloonist Don Cameron, the balloon’s designer and manufacturer, and the man in charge of take-off, said everything proceeded perfectly. Overnight, the balloon’s envelope was pumped with approximately ten thousand cubic metres of helium.

Photo: SkyWorks WA

Just before take-off, Pilot Fedor Konyukhov slightly heated the air in the envelope, and the balloon began to rise steadily at a speed of two metres per second. Fedor Konyukhov took-off with the maximum possible fuel reserve (propane) on board. All thirty-five gas cylinders were fitted around the gondola.

“The significance of this event cannot be overstated,” says Oleg Kolchenko, Vice-President of GK “Morton”, and company organiser and project investor. “An international team of more than one hundred unique specialisations, from Russia, Australia, England, and Belgium, have worked tirelessly for the flight to take place. We have come up against a vast amount of new information, but we worked together and made it happen.”

Escorting the balloon, the team and journalists from every major television channel ran to their respective helicopters and managed to chase down the rising aircraft.

The first, Australian, stage of the project has come to an end. Morton is in the sky. The team of technical specialists responsible for filling the envelope can return to the U.K. with a sense of fulfilment. The baton has now been taken up by the specialists at the Northam Flight Control Centre

From this moment a ground team will begin following Morton’s flight path, with the help of several satellites. We will know the coordinates of the balloon at any moment, as well as the balloon’s altitude, course, speed, and even the temperature on board the gondola. The gondola’s interior temperature will be relayed by the pilot.

From the moment of takeoff, Fedor Konyukhov made three phone calls to the Northam Flight Control Centre, using the Iridium satellite service to make a report on his wellbeing. He said that he will be using an oxygen mask past 3,000 metres altitude (10,000 feet). It is cold in the gondola – seven degrees Celsius. He hasn’t been using his heater during the day in an attempt to save fuel for heating at night, when the temperature on board will plummet to minus thirty degrees Celsius

After the balloon reached its maximum altitude for the first day – 22,000 feet, Fedor ran a check on the envelope’s control system. It is currently 3:00pm in Australia, and in two hours the sun will set. Fedor Konyukhov is set to experience his first night as the sole pilot at an altitude of 6,500-7,000 metres. The ground team is doing its best to help the Pilot, but in the end every important action has to be performed by him, all we can do is observe.

Oscar Konyukhov

Northam, Australia

   

See an interactive map of Fedor Konyukhov’s route at konyukhov.ru/map

You can also view the route map at www.iridium360.ru

The official website for the project “Around the world in a Roziere balloon “Morton” can be found at a flyfedor.ru

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01.07.2016

Round the world balloon launch is postponed until next week

Based on weather forecast and recommendation from weather adviser the team have decided to abandon the Saturday morning launch. The conditions remain difficult due to the active cold front. The balloon would travel with it over its entire length till Tasmania, with an important precipitation and icing risk, possibly making the balloon heavier and obliging it to go to lower levels.

Details

Based on weather forecast and recommendation from weather adviser the team have decided to abandon the Saturday morning launch. 

The conditions remain difficult due to the active cold front. The balloon would travel with it over its entire length till Tasmania, with an important precipitation and icing risk, possibly making the balloon heavier and obliging it to go to lower levels.

Apologize for all the inconvenience to people of Northam, Northam airport management and to all volunteers who booked this day to help us with envelope set up. We will keep you updated regularly on this web site.



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