Fedor Konyukhov
enru
08.01.2014

The first 1000 miles

Today marked a very important event - my first thousand miles in the Pacific Ocean. Psychologically, it's very uplifting. How many more thousands of miles I'l have to cover is hard to say; it all depends on the weather and how it's going to affect my route.

Details

Fedor on the satphone: "Today marked a very important event - my first thousand miles in the Pacific Ocean. Psychologically, it's very uplifting. How many more thousands of miles I'l have to cover is hard to say; it all depends on the weather and how it's going to affect my route. Today the Pacific Ocean around me is calm, the sun is peeping through the clouds. The accumulators are being charged. I'll try to run waterwmaker in the evening. Here I've got to catch a right moment to do certain things. The ocean is deserted: no whales, dolphins, or flying fish. I'm sure it's temporary. The surface of the ocean is unruffled making it easy to row. Tourgoyak is not tipping violently anymore. I switched the short oars, which are 3 meters with the medium ones. These are 3.2 meters long and made specifically for the current conditions. I have one more pair of oars: they are 3.4 meters long and useful for the most tranquil and glassy surface.  This range in length of the oars can be compared to a manual gearbox in a car. I followed the recommendations of my friend Simon Chalk and got the Xcell oars. This company is the most known amongst the ocean rowers. The Xcell oars are tested and tried in every ocean of the world.  The fiber tube is 100% carbon fiber with Kevlar reinforcement, the fixed handles made from Ash wood, and the weight is about 2 kg per oar. I have three sets of oars, because I know from my own experience, and from the stories of other rowers, how easy it is to lose an oar in the ocean. It can break or a wave can snatch it right off the boat. Without the oars how would one proceed on the row boat? The other two sets of oars are stored diagonally across each side of the boat. It has been 17 days and 1000 miles on the ocean. Overall it's a good result. I'm fully adjusted to my rowing routine. Each day I take time to inspect Tourgoyak from bow to stern looking for any signs of leakage. The tropics have welcomed me with warm, even hot temperatures. I'm heading west and a bit north. With God's help and your prayers I shall overcome. I'm with you. Fedor."


The map of the Tourgoyak's course: http://yb.tl/konyukhov2

The detailed map of the course: www.oceanrowing.com/Konyukhov/Pacific2013/dist_map.htm

Translated by Tatiana Koreski



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07.01.2014

In the dark

Wishing a peaceful and joyous Christmas to all who celebrate the Orthodox Christmas. It’s a gift from God that we live to see this special day. All is well on board. My Christmas Eve on the ocean was peaceful, with nothing exciting.

Details

Fedor on the satphone: “Wishing a peaceful and joyous Christmas to all who celebrate the Orthodox Christmas. It’s a gift from God that we live to see this special day. All is well on board. My Christmas Eve on the ocean was peaceful, with nothing exciting. I’ve got a good wind of 12-15 knots from east. This wind allows me to proceed straight to west. The only thing that bothers me is a complete darkness. The sky is shut tight with the thick clouds that don’t let any sun rays to pass through. At night it’s pitch black. Last night the accumulators worked quite a bit and now there is no sun to recharge them. There. Is. No. Sun. Rowing helps to keep my mind off this utter darkness but as soon as I stop working - I get scared. At night, it’s particularly unnerving, when I can’t even see the oar spoons which are only three meters away. I can hear the ocean, the waves, the wind, but I can see nothing. It’s precisely in these kinds of moments I feel extremely small: like a grain of sand lost in this vast ocean. The thing that keeps me focused is Our Lord’s Prayer.”

Due to the low batteries on board, our phone call with Fedor was short, only 5 minutes. According to the satellite picture of the region where Fedor and Tourgoyak are at this moment (20° South Latitude and 80° West Longitude), the overcast is 99%.  This means that there is only 1% of sun that reaches the surface of the ocean.  Such conditions will persist until January 10, 2014 according to a cloud cover forecast from www.passageweather.com.

The map of the Tourgoyak’s course: http://yb.tl/konyukhov2

The detailed map of the course: www.oceanrowing.com/Konyukhov/Pacific2013/dist_map.htm

 

Translated by Tatiana Koreski

 



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06.01.2014

Riding the Ocean Currents

The expedition headquarters of Fedor Konyukhov received numerous questions related to why the boat Tourgoyak is heading the northwest instead of directly west, which would be a shorter route. We bring you the comments from the experts of the Ocean Rowing Society International (London, UK).

Details

The expedition headquarters of Fedor Konyukhov received numerous questions related to why the boat Tourgoyak is heading the northwest instead of directly west, which would be a shorter route. We bring you the comments from the experts of the Ocean Rowing Society International (London, UK).

"Any route of crossing the ocean be it under the sail or on oars depends on the ocean currents and prevailing directions of the winds. The ocean rowers - even more so than the sailors - rely and depend on these two factors. Rowers would capture the current right at the start or navigate their way to eventfully merge with the current. Therefore, neither first nor second approach allow for a straight route.

In the Atlantic, the best illustration of this "curvature" of the route is seen in the way Columbus sailed to the shores of the New World. Coming out of Spain and Portugal, the caravels first went south to the Canary Islands, following the Canary Current reaching almost to the Cape Verde Islands. From there they entered the Trade Winds and the North Equatorial Current that would allow them to cross the Atlantic from east to west. On the way home, from west to east, they had to catch the Gulf Stream which took them north across the Atlantic. From there they had to head back to Spain. 

In the Pacific Ocean, the Peruvian Current (Humboldt) passes along the coast of South America from south to north. It is one of the largest ocean currents in the world. Fedor’s goal was to catch the Peruvian Current and ride to 15-20 degree of the Southern Latitude. There he will enter the zone of the southerly Trade Winds which will allow him to turn west towards Australia.

A map of the Pacific Ocean currents clearly shows that one can arrive to Australia by means of the Trade Winds while slowly navigating south. Fedor will have to work hard to not be caught up in the the East Australian Current which would divert him to New Zealand. However, if Fedor lingers too much in the Trade Winds there will be a high risk of getting swept into the Equatorial Current which would turn him back to south-east.

 An ocean row boat can not go against the current nor against the wind.  No matter how incomprehensible his "indirect" route may seem to us, Fedor as an experienced sea explorer knows that this route is logical, practical, and therefore, the only possible route to navigate between South America and Australia.

During the first two weeks, as the distance from the start grew large so did the distance to the finish line. This, as we have seen, is understandable: Fedor is moving to Australia in an arc, repeating the main direction of the currents.

On the eleventh day (January 2, 2014) of his transpacific crossing, Fedor was 534 nautical miles away from Concon and 6523 miles from Brisbane, Australia, which means turning north added 137 miles to the distance between Fedor and the finish. However, after January 5th, the distance finally started to decrease. The last time we spoke with Fedor the distance was 6482 nautical miles.

The map of the Tourgoyak’s course: http://yb.tl/konyukhov2

The detailed map of the course: www.oceanrowing.com/Konyukhov/Pacific2013/dist_map.htm

 The Ocean Rowing Society International

 www.oceanrowing.com/

 Translated by Tatiana Koreski



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05.01.2014

Two weeks on the ocean

It’s been two weeks since I left Concon for Australia. Tourgoyak and I have ventured 800 miles, but the Australian continent has not moved any closer. It’s hard to predict how many weeks just like the last two I’m going to have here.

Details

It’s been two weeks since I left Concon for Australia.  Tourgoyak and I have ventured 800 miles, but the Australian continent has not moved any closer. It’s hard to predict how many weeks just like the last two I’m going to have here. 

Today is a good day. The weather is cooperating: light breeze and steady waves. It is time to organize the boat and its belongings. I finally changed from my Musto water proof suit into shorts and a t-shirt. In such a long ocean marathon it’s vital not only to take care of the boat but of myself as well. It’s necessary to force myself to drink enough water and eat a hot meal at least twice a day.  The last two weeks were very stressful.  I lost some weight already and think it’s about time to start taking better care of myself.

I used the watermaker for the first time this week and got a couple bottles of fresh water. It was high time to do so because I had switched to my reserve fresh water supply and that’s not a good thing. The watermaker is made by the Schenker company.

It works off the solar panel and takes one hour to make 30 liters of water.  Of course, I don’t run it for an entire hour at a time; 15 minutes is enough. The watermaker is the heart of the boat. Without it I won’t last more than a week. Rain water is of no use here. When it rains it gets mixed with the ocean spray since the squalls are our constant companions. I also brought a manual watermaker by Katadyn Survivor 35.

This one takes one hour to make 4 liters of water. I sure hope I won’t need it, but to have a spare one on board is mandatory, in my opinion. It’s important to have a spare for each critical item such as oars, rudder, oars gate, and communication equipment. The only originals here are me and Tourgoyak. We must take care of each other.

It is time to celebrate the Orthodox Christmas. Wishing everyone a nice Christmas Eve. I’m with you. Fedor.”

The map of the Tourgoyak’s course: http://yb.tl/konyukhov2

The detailed map of the course: www.oceanrowing.com/Konyukhov/Pacific2013/dist_map.htm

 

Translated by Tatiana Koreski



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04.01.2014

The Tourgoyak has crossed the South Tropics

Today was a significant day. Tourgoyak crossed the South Tropic and entered the tropical latitudes. If everything goes according to plan Fedor and Tourgoyak will spend the majority of the journey, 5-6 months, in these latitudes.

Details

Today was a significant day. Tourgoyak crossed the South Tropic and entered the tropical latitudes. If everything goes according to plan Fedor and Tourgoyak will spend the majority of the journey, 5-6 months, in these latitudes.

The Tropic of Capricorn is one of the five major circles of latitude that mark maps of the Earth. As of 2014 its latitude is 23° 26' south of the Equator. 

Fedor on his satphone: "The situation is much calmer today. The  waves are big, but the wind is no more than 20 knots. The ocean is giving me a little break, perhaps due to my entrance into the tropics. I even managed to prepare a hot meal. It's really simple when you talk about it: you boil some water and add it to a package of freeze dried soup. However this process was rather difficult to perform for the last few days. Eating this hot meal brought memories from my polar expedition with Victor Simonov across the Arctic in April-May 2013. Every morning and night Victor and I would make the exact same food. It's amazing how time flies. In the spring of 2013 I was on the drifting ice of the  Arctic Ocean, and right now I'm in a ocean row-boat in the South Pacific Ocean.“

Photo: Victor Simonov and Fedor Konyukhov. North Pole. 2013

“Last night the waves dropped on board three small calamari. I cleaned them and dunked in the boiled water for a few seconds. These little guys made a very nice addition to my dried food menu. I have fishing poles and all the fishing gear but due to the weather I haven’t had the chance to do any fishing. Hopefully I’ll get to do some fishing later if the weather cooperates.

The sky is thick with clouds; the solar panel is charging just enough for the most essential electronic equipment. Today I reached the traverse of Chilean port Antofagasta. There are 500 nautical miles between us. According to the map  I'm still in the zone that containerships travel. I see them regularly; most likely they are travelling between the Panama Canal and Chile. The AIS continues to send signals when a vessel is detected somewhere on the horizon, or even beyond. I may not see the ship, but if I get a signal then instinctively I cannot relax until it's gone from the radar.

And so it goes. Another day on the ocean. Thank you to all for your support and prayers. I’m with you. Fedor."

Translated by Tatiana Koreski



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03.01.2014

Day 13

The night was very intense. The wind was 20-25 knots. With the squalls the wind would reach up to 30 knots. There were a few times when the waves hit the boat so hard that I thought: that’s it, we are going to capsize.

Details

Fedor on the satellite phone: “The night was very intense. The wind was 20-25 knots. With the squalls the wind would reach up to 30 knots. There were a few times when the waves hit the boat so hard that I thought: that’s it, we are going to capsize. Once every hour the port side experiences the loudest and powerful blow that brings the boat to the brinks of capsizing. From the port side I released 100 meters of 12 mm rope with fender attached to add some resistance against the waves. My head is in a kayak helmet. This weather is starting to wear me out psychologically. I’m very tired. There is no way to rest right now. The hull gets a blow after a blow, and then another blow; and it happens nonstop. The waves lift Tourgoyak five meters up, and from there the boat surfs down at a speed of 6 knots. Then comes another ride just like that. It happens every hour: day and night. Despite my previous five circumnavigations, I feel sea sick here. When is it going to end? All I need is the wind of 10, not more than 15 knots. For a row boat anything beyond 20 knots is too much, but when there is 30 knots – it is a complete survival.  On top of this wind, the waves are gigantic. The autopilot is working well though.  Both main accumulators ran out of juice during last night, so by morning I turned on the reserve batteries. There is no sun, low clouds and occasional drenching rain. The Ocean is very loud. The white caps are everywhere. The situation is rather depressing.
I constantly think about my boat. This is her first time in the ocean. There is no history of how she behaves in storms and strong winds.  My only fear is of capsizing. The temperature of the Humboldt Current is extremely cold. I’m wearing a waterproof suit from Musto MPX. I was wearing the same suit when sailed around the Cape Horn. My boots are from Dubbary. A hat and the gloves are mandatory. And of course, I live with the harness attached to me. This has been my attire for the last 10 days.

Back in 2002 when I was crossing the Atlantic Ocean, I had an easier time psychologically. Despite the wind of 20 knots, I knew that the transatlantic crossing has been done many times, and dozens of ocean rowers have completed this crossing successfully. Here, in the South Pacific, everything is unchartered; everything is for the first time. The massiveness of the ocean is pressing hard on me. I have to be honest: I didn’t expect it to be so hard. 

Before me, this route was taken by a Swedish adventurer Anders Svedlund in 1974. He left Huasco, Chile and crossed the ocean all the way to Samoa. Unfortunately I don’t have maps of his course, and don’t know what the weather and winds were like during his crossing. For me the biggest worry is the wind. If it increases, how am going to survive? If I drop the sea anchors it would slow the boat significantly. However, this could also mean that the gigantic waves would crush the boat unmercifully. If I continue to ride Tourgoyak up and down the waves there is always a high risk of capsizing or rolling over.

The accumulators are running low so I must end this phone call. I thank God that I survived the night. Pray that the day will be a bit easier.”

According to the weather map, Tourgoyak has entered another local cyclone. Such weather will continue for the next 24 hours. Once Fedor is able to reach the Tropic of Capricorn (or Southern tropic) the wind should drop to 15-20 knots. Fedor and Tourgoyak are experiencing the Trade Winds of the South Pacific Ocean and the Humboldt Current. Judging from the weather reports the Trade Winds have reached their true potential and will continue to “work” like this all the way to French Polynesia. It is possible that at some point the winds won’t be as strong, but in general, Fedor shouldn’t expect the wind dropping to 5 knots any time soon. The now low temperature (16 C) of the Humboldt Current should rise to 24 C once Tourgoyak reaches the center of the South Pacific Ocean. 

To get the weather report for the next week click here (look for South Pacific Ocean).

The map of the Tourgoyak’s course: http://yb.tl/konyukhov2

The detailed map of the course: www.oceanrowing.com/Konyukhov/Pacific2013/dist_map.htm

 Translated by Tatiana Koreski



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01.01.2014

Comments on the current boat progress from project consultant - Simon Chalk

Fedor is approaching his first waypoint. Before the start Fedor together with project consultant Simon Chalk set up 7 waypoints across Pacific Ocean as a target marks during the crossing. Here are some comments from Simon Chalk regarding Fedor’s progress so far and the route he is taking now.

Details

Fedor is approaching his first waypoint. Before the start Fedor together with project consultant Simon Chalk set up 7 waypoints across Pacific Ocean as a target marks during the crossing. Here are some comments from Simon Chalk regarding Fedor’s progress so far and the route he is taking now.

«It seemed to be difficult to see how Fedor would break away from the coast without being affected by the low pressure systems that track across the Southern Ocean - these in affect cause Southerly wind and wave sets running up the Chilean Coast. These weather systems are so large that they also dramatically affect the localized pressure system and as a result cause "mini spin off" lows that move up the coastline. As a secondary affect there is also the Humboldt (Peru) Current that also travels in a South to North direction before then heading off shore. With these affects in mind - the first waypoints allow Fedor a realistic target of just gaining distance from the coastline. Then as the wind changes direction to more of an Easterly, it is planned that Fedor drops further South again by Mid way across the ocean.

This is a view to take advantage of the stronger more predominant easterly@@apos@@s without falling out of the top of them further North. It also gives a better position to miss the more densely placed Island groups in the mid-Pacific region. The run in over the later third of the voyage should be more stable in terms of direction, the obstacles become less and the weather systems are more settled - the final third should see an increase in boat speed (as the boat gets lighter) and the more established current takes affect. The progress to date has been very steady and strong. The boat has handled the tough conditions well. Not only the sea conditions but also limited sunlight and strong wind strength. It is always the toughest part of rowing an ocean from a large land mass, getting clear of the coast. Over the next few days, Fedor should be rewarded for his hard work and if as predicted, the wind turns more to an Easterly - there should be great progress towards the West. It’s a very different Ocean to Row than the Atlantic and all progress forwards (however small in the early stages) are strong steps.

Here are the waypoints we set up for Fedor prior his departure from Chile:

Waypoint 1 26.00.00 S 77.00.00 W

Waypoint 2 21.00.00 S 108.00.00 W

Waypoint 3 23.00.00 S 131.00.00 W

Waypoint 4 26.00.00 S 147.00.00 W

Waypoint 5 27.00.00 S 175.00.00 W

Waypoint 6 27.00.00 S 163.00.00 E

Waypoint 7 27.00.00 S 153.00.00 E

Simon Chalk».

Latest position report is here: http://yb.tl/konyukhov2

 



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01.01.2014

The first day of the New year

The first day of the New Year brought some good news. The wind has finally changed and I am able to keep my course west-north-west. I can breathe a bit easier now! The current and the winds are just what I need.

Details

Fedor via satellite phone: “The first day of the New Year brought some good news. The wind has finally changed and I am able to keep my course west-north-west. I can breathe a bit easier now! The current and the winds are just what I need. To celebrate the new beginning and the new weather conditions I wanted to open a bottle of wine but the AIS system located a tanker straight ahead of Tourgoyak. I had to postpone the celebration and work on maneuvering Tourgoyak to pass the vessel. In the end, we parted within three miles. On New Year’s Eve I crossed the latitude of the Australian city Brisbane, which is where I’m supposed to arrive. That, however, is only a theory right now. I can plan, predict and hope for the best, but in reality can’t even imagine how this transpacific crossing will unfold. Other than the new wind direction I don’t have any other big news. The routine hasn’t changed much: a couple of hours of working on oars, followed hour of resting and working on board. Before falling asleep I set an alarm clock. Altogether, I sleep about 5-6 hours, about the same I do back at home. Tonight there is no moon, and it is complete darkness here, but for some reason I prefer a night shifts. In general, as with my other expeditions, emotionally it’s easy for me to be alone, even though physically it’s a lot harder to do such crossings solo. Right now my navigational approach is pretty simple: study the map, keep up the course and the speed. There are no islands nearby so my main goal is to stay away from the ocean vessels passing by. They approach Tourgoyak really fast: it takes about half an hour to close on me since their first appearance on the horizon. I read somewhere that there was an ocean rower who could sleep through the entire night and upon waking up study how far his boat would drift off course. That takes some nerve, let me tell you. I can’t even imagine sleeping through the night oblivious to where my boat is drifting.”

Judging from the weather map of the entire Pacific Ocean from the South America to Australia, we can conclude that Tourgoyak is entering the Trade Winds of the South Pacific.  The winds are from south-east and stable all the way to the French Polynesia, including Tahiti.  The region on the map where Tourgoyak is present right now is colored in green which means the wind is 20-25 knots. Such weather should last until January 4th, 2014.  For a more detailed map click here

We continue to receive the weather report update from the Armada de Chile:

INFORME METEOROLOGICO VALIDO 010800/020800 HORA LOCAL.
SITUACION SINOPTICA:
MARGEN ANTICICLONICO.
PRONOSTICO:
NUBLADO A PARCIAL, VIS 20 KMS, VTO S/SE 18/25 NDS,
MAR MAREJADA (1.8/2.5 MTS).
----------------------------------------------------
WEATHER AND SEA BULLETIN VALID 010800/020800 LOCAL TIME.
SYNOPTIC SITUATION:
ANTICYCLONIC EDGE.
FORECAST:
BROKEN TO SCATTERED, VIS 20 KM, WIND S/SE 18/25 KT,
SEA STATE MODERATE (1.8/2.5 M).

We must report that today we have not received the coordinates from Yellow Brick buoy. No coordinates from 00:00, 04:00 and 12:00 (Universal Time Coordinate). The specialists who operate the Yellow Brick system have no definitive answers at what caused the missing coordinates. However, we did receive a phone call from Fedor at 15:00 (Moscow time) and he informed us that the buoy is still on board of Tourgoyak.   

Map of Tourgoyak's course: http://yb.tl/konyukhov2

More detailed map provided by the Ocean Rowing Society International: www.oceanrowing.com/Konyukhov/Pacific2013/dist_map.htm

Translated by Tatiana Koreski



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31.12.2013

Meeting a New Year in the Ocean

December 31st. The last day of the year. There on land, the preparations for the celebrations are in full steam. Here, in the South Pacific Ocean, everything is the same as far as my daily routine goes. The wind is 25 knots and today it is more southerly. I@@apos@@m waiting for it to change so I can proceed more westerly. The Humboldt Current is astonishing in its power. It@@apos@@s a gigantic and powerful river. My experience in rowing across the Atlantic ocean so far is nothing compare to the conditions of rowing in the Pacific. There is no way I could row straight across the Humboldt from east to west

Details

December 31st. The last day of the year. There on land, the preparations for the celebrations are in full steam. Here, in the South Pacific Ocean, everything is the same as far as my daily routine goes. The wind is 25 knots and today it is more southerly. I@@apos@@m waiting for it to change so I can proceed more westerly. The Humboldt Current is astonishing in its power. It@@apos@@s a gigantic and powerful river. My experience in rowing across the Atlantic ocean so far is nothing compare to the conditions of rowing in the Pacific. There is no way I could row straight across the Humboldt from east to west. The only way is to continue diagonally from south-east to north-west. To accomplish that I need extra distance longitudinally which gives me room to stay north-west without being completely swept and taken up north. It@@apos@@s a good thing I used Concon as a starting point. I remember considering port Antofogasta in northern Chile for the start. It had its own advantages such as warmer weather, minimal risk of storms, but the main disadvantage was to be carried away north, beyond the Equator. This happened to Andrew Halsey when he set out from Peru to Australia, he was gripped by the winds and currents, and ended up in the Northern Hemisphere from which he couldn@@apos@@t get back on course.  

Right now the most important thing for me is to keep my course west; the more west the better. With the strong south-west wind I can@@apos@@t put Tourgoyak across the wave, it would simply capsize the boat. During the night I release the sea anchor at 50 meters overboard to stabilize the boat. Since the start I haven@@apos@@t slept in the aft cabin. I haven@@apos@@t slept laying down. Resting and catching some naps in a sitting or semi-laying position in nav station cabin is all I can afford right now. Still waiting for calmer weather to dry off the clothes and tidy up the boat. Tried to use the water maker but decided to quit: the boat is rocking too much. My cooking is limited, mostly adding hot water to packages of freeze-dried soups. According to Simon Chalk I should be using 6500 k.calories each day eating expedition dry food. However, I@@apos@@m hardly using half of that amount.

Fedor Konyukhov took freeze dry food for 200 days from 2 suppliers:

-          http://www.expeditionfoods.com/ (UK)

-          http://drytech.no/index.php/en/ (Norway)

Last night parted with a ship without any stress. The AIS equipment is very convenient to have on board. It sends alarm signal and shows on display what type of vessel, as well as its course and speed. I can@@apos@@t imagine now to do the ocean crossing without AIS. How did I manage before the AIS?!

I@@apos@@m thankful for the year 2013. I@@apos@@m glad to meet the New 2014 year on board of Tourgoyak experiencing the greatness of the South Pacific Ocean. Let@@apos@@s pray and ask God to grant us a year of peace without calamities and troubles.

Map of Tourgoyak@@apos@@s course: http://yb.tl/konyukhov2

More detailed map provided by the Ocean Rowing Society International: www.oceanrowing.com/Konyukhov/Pacific2013/dist_map.htm

Translated by Tatiana Koreski



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30.12.2013

Tourgoyak progress is covered by the Ocean Rowing Society International

Last week the office of Fedor Konyukhov made an important agreement with the Ocean Rowing Society International based in London, UK. According to this agreement the ORSI’s specialists will follow Tourgoyak’s progress in the Pacific Ocean and post a detailed map of how many miles have been covered, the speed and course of the row boat, and the current and future weather reports in the region. The ORSI was established in 1983 by Peter Bird and Kenneth F. Crutchlow

Details

Last week the office of Fedor Konyukhov made an important agreement with the Ocean Rowing Society International based in London, UK. According to this agreement the ORSI’s specialists will follow Tourgoyak’s progress in the Pacific Ocean and post a detailed map of how many miles have been covered, the speed and course of the row boat, and the current and future weather reports in the region. The ORSI was established in 1983 by Peter Bird and Kenneth F. Crutchlow. In the book “Stop Drifting, Start Rowing: One Woman@@apos@@s Search for Happiness and Meaning Alone on the Pacific” Roz Savage describes the story behind the creation of the IORS: “It was founded by Kenneth Crutchlow who, although he has never rowed an ocean himself, has been involved in ocean rowing since the 1980s. He famously took a resupply of food to the late, great Peter Bird when he was running out of rations in mid-Pacific, thousands of miles from the nearest landfall. Kenneth chartered a catamaran and set out with a boat full of supplies to rendezvous with Peter. Thus was born the Ocean Rowing Society” (Savage, 56).

For the last thirty years the ORSI has been following every ocean crossing, successful as well as unsuccessful. This organization carries a great deal of information on every trans-oceanic course that has been attempted, abandoned or completed. It also holds history and stories about many oceanic rowers, their achievements, competitions, disappointments, and new challenges. The ORSI statistics on every conceivable ocean crossing can be found here.    

Fedor’s land team is grateful that the IORS will cover Tourgoyak’s transpacific crossing in such a detailed manner. Using the Yellow Brick buoys’ signals the ORSI will be able to calculate a daily distance that’s been covered, the distance that remains to Australia, and the distance that is left behind.  

To follow the map and the information provided by the ORSI go to www.oceanrowing.com/Konyukhov/Pacific2013/dist_map.htm.

The Yellow Brick map continues to work as well:  http://yb.tl/konyukhov2.

Sources Cited:

1.      www.oceanrowing.com

2.      Savage, Roz. Stop Drifting, Start Rowing: One Woman@@apos@@s Search for Happiness and Meaning Alone on the Pacific.  Hay House, Inc. Reprint edition (October 15, 2013).

Translated by Tatiana Koreski

 



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